The Switchboard: How Apple’s internal university trains its employees

August 11

Published every weekday, the Switchboard is your morning helping of hand-picked stories from the Switch team.

Father of PGP encryption: Telcos need to get out of bed with governments. "We needed to create the conditions where nobody was going to lean on us for backdoors because they need it themselves," according to PGP encryption developer Phil Zimmerman in Ars Technica. "If Navy SEALs are using this, if our own government develops a dependency on it, then they’ll recognize that it would be counter-productive for them to get a backdoor in our product."

Inside Apple's internal training program. "Steven P. Jobs established Apple University as a way to inculcate employees into Apple’s business culture and educate them about its history," writes the New York Times, "particularly as the company grew and the tech business changed. Courses are not required, only recommended, but getting new employees to enroll is rarely a problem."

After Twitch's copyright crackdown, what about games themselves? "Videogame streaming site Twitch is officially a big media site and can no longer fly under the legal radar, as evidenced by this week’s announcement that videos in its archives with unlicensed music will be flagged and partially muted," reports Re/code. "So, what about the videogames themselves? Could a copyrighted game get taken down from Twitch at the behest of the gaming industry?"

Amazon smacks back at Hachette in e-book pricing battle: We're doing it for the readers. The Register reports: Amazon "sent an open letter out to Amazon authors and published it on its newly created readersunited.com website, calling on folks to support its attempts to make ebooks cheaper … Amazon handed out the e-mail address of Hachette CEO Michael Pietsch and encouraged folks to e-mail him and talk about how Hachette was messing things up for everyone."

Dispute erupts between Amazon and Disney. "The latest to feel the Seattle retailer's sting is Walt Disney Co.," reports the Wall Street Journal. "Amazon isn't accepting pre-orders of forthcoming Disney DVD and Blu-ray titles including 'Captain America: The Winter Soldier' and 'Maleficent.'"

Brian Fung covers technology for The Washington Post.
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