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TheRootDC
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Posted at 11:58 AM ET, 03/05/2012

Blind D.C. photographer captured black historic firsts

I wrote a story about what it's like to be a black hockey fan in D.C. for Sunday's Outlook section. I'll be holding a live chat this afternoon at 2 p.m. to discuss the piece, as well. Please send in your questions! Should be a fun one.


Washington Capitals' Alexander Ovechkin (8) battles for the puck against Philadelphia Flyers' Pavel Kubina during their NHL hockey game in Washington March 4, 2012.clint (Kevin Lamarque - Reuters)
Vigilante justice is still alive and well in D.C. And it's making things more difficult for police and, in some instances, has potentially led to more violence. When an argument over a gold-colored bracelet set off a series of shootings in March 2010 in Southeast, the police had plenty of witnesses. But one in particular refused to identify the suspects to police. He wanted to kill them himself, he said in court. He failed. And more people got killed as a result, police say. The Post's Keith L. Alexander explains.

When you hear the words “blind photographer,” it's quite confusing. But for Ray Wilson, his memory serves as the only sight that will allow him to see his vast collection of works from when he was an eyewitness to history. Wilson was an amateur photographer who took particular pride in shooting characters that make up the fabric of black culture in this country. Sadly, he lost his sight before he got to take Obama's picture as president. Read this amazing yet bittersweet feature by The Post's Josh DuLac.

If you're eating lunch specifically while reading this , save the following item until you're done. There are two major agencies in this country that regulate the food we eat, the USDA and the FDA. The two agencies have been working in what's considered a reactionary mode to food-borne hazards that crop up and kill about 3,000 Americans a year. The Post's Dina ElBoghdady points out the scary fact that well-known microbiologists don't have much faith in either agency's efficiency.

Rush Limbaugh is finally facing the music . When the conservative radio host called a Georgetown University law student a slut and a prostitute, the public outrage became too much to ignore. He then issued the old non-apology apology, because he was up to his neck in hot water. Now, companies are pulling their ads because they don't want to be affiliated, and The Post's Paul Farhi wonders whether this will be Limbaugh's Don Imus moment.

Speaking of hockey, the Caps are struggling big time . As of right now, the team is on the outside looking in for the playoffs, and they haven't scored a goal all month. To boot, Alex Ovechkin, by his own admission, is partly to blame for last night's 1-0 loss to Philadelphia at home on national television. The only thing that really went the team's way was a fight in the first period in which Troy Brouwer held his own. And we have more controversy about who's getting ice time and who's not. Great.

Extra Bites

• What would your life be like if you decided to go completely cashless? You probably wouldn't make too many friends in the bar industry, but Slate's Seth Stevenson is going on nearly two months without using actual currency.

• You know what cheese flavor is taking over the nation? Pepperjack! Great, another one of my favorite things that'll now be out of stock everywhere.

• Google is apparently planning it's own version of Apple's Siri. I hope they crowdsource the name.

Check out my Facebook fan page, my Twitter feed, or e-mail me at clinton.yates@wpost.com .

Read more on The Root DC

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Episode Three: An animated defense of Adrian Fenty

A lifetime of civil rights

Black women cite perks, challenges

Cupcakes by the Anacostia river

By  |  11:58 AM ET, 03/05/2012

Categories:  Lunchline

 
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