Google announces privacy policy changes


Singer Alicia Keys performs at the iHeartRadio Music Festival. (Christopher Polk/GETTY IMAGES FOR CLEAR CHANNEL)

Last night, I eschewed SOTU bingo or going to the bar to watch the speech and focused on it from home. I was not disappointed. In a non-partisan sense, it was actually a non-boring, listenable speech that wasn't peppered with awkward interruptions, an overload of applause or typically boring boilerplate material. To boot, Obama delivered it while U.S. special forces were rescuing kidnapped aid workers in Somalia. Also, the hug with Gabby Giffords was quite the nice moment.

Google is following you . Not on Twitter, not around the corner, but everywhere that you use one of its products. It's tracking your every move. And yes, they're reading your e-mail, too. The company announced yesterday that a new privacy agreement will be put in place on March 1, and users have no choice to opt out. Google says the informational tracking is for the purpose of better tailoring ads to its customers. Others call the new practice "frightening." The Post's Cecilia Kang reports.

D.C. is frequently at the top of various lists that rank cities for one thing or another. This week, Travel + Leisure Magazine has ranked the nation's capital the third rudest city in America, up (or down) from number 5 last year. Say what you like about this ranking, I believe it to be true. I also don't consider that a problem. I could get in to a whole diatribe about why certain people are rude to each other, but it doesn't really matter, does it? The Post's Katie Rogers wants to know what you think about the ranking.

Back before iPhones, there were things called PDAs . Personal digital assistants were effectively the first smartphones, even if they didn't make calls. They also featured a nifty little tool, that Steve Jobs decided he wanted to rid the world of, and eventually did. And with that, the stylus went the way of the dodo. But Slate's Farhad Manjoo wants to bring it back. He's been playing with various new toys that simulate the stylus effect for iPhone and iPad and is convinced that handwriting apps will make a comeback.

The Wizards fired Flip Saunders yesterday, but who really cares . That team is bad no matter who's at the helm and it will be lucky to win 10 games this year. On a more positive note, the Caps head into the All-Star break with a win after Matty Perreault notched a hat trick to beat the Bruins. But more importantly, the Nationals missed out on Prince Fielder. From more than an on-field standpoint, this is disappointing on so many levels. He was the star they needed for relevancy in this city. Alas.

Extra Bites

• Wikileaks founder Julian Assange is getting his own TV talk show on a Russian station, to be aired from his home while he's on house arrest. This promises to be the most riveting home-shot programming since Sheen's Korner.

• The last of the secret Kennedy tapes have been released. And yes, there are spooky premonitions about his potential funeral date. I find this fascinating.

• And just like that, there's a college course about Beyonce on its way to Rutgers.

Check out my Facebook fan page, my Twitter feed, or e-mail me at clinton.yates@wpost.com

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Clinton Yates is a D.C. native and an online columnist. When he's not covering the city, pop culture or listening to music, he watches sports. A lot of them.
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