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TheRootDC
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Posted at 11:47 AM ET, 03/19/2012

Rush Limbaugh blacklash continues

Technically, today is the last day of winter. In other news, it's supposed to be near 80 degrees outside. Count me in on believing in climate change.

Every black man remembers “the discussion.” It's the talk when a relative explains to you that through no fault of your own, you are likely to be the victim of unfair discrimination. Mine came from my mom before sixth grade. When Trayvon Martin was killed by a neighborhood watch captain near Orlando, I thought immediately of my mother. The story has sparked national outrage, understandably. The Post's Jonathan Capehart explains what it's like to be constantly “under suspicion.”


Washingtonian gangsta rapper Fat Trel photographed in the neighborhood he grew up in Northeast on March 8, 2012 in Washington, D.C. (Ricky Carioti - The Washington Post)
D.C. and hip-hop have had an arduous relationship. But in the last few years, things have changed drastically on that front. With the rise of artists like Wale, Tabi Bonney and Black Cobain, the city has been able to release the shackles of go-go and make some noise in the rap game. And there's no one that better embodies this new generation than Fat Trel. He's a 21-year-old raised in Northeast, and he raps his face off. The Post's Chris Richards has a profile ahead of his new mixtape release.

The fallout from Rush Limbaugh's words continues. As advertisers continue to disassociate themselves from the right-wing pundit, the reverberations are being felt all across the talk radio landscape. Oddly, in a medium that's supposed to spark controversy, people — like Dan Sileo, who worked at Tampa's WDAE for15 years before getting fired for referring to three black football players as “monkeys” — are losing their jobs for doing so. The Post's Paul Farhi explains why the leash is now shorter.

Some people will do anything to sell their houses. And recently, professional home stagers have broken out a new trick that preys on your self-esteem. Instead of relying on what you may see in the house you potentially want to buy, it's become the new trend to optimize what you see in yourself. Real estate agent Pat Kennedy has been noticing a lot more skinny mirrors in her dealings. As in, mirrors that make you look skinnier. Whatever works, I guess.

Jason Clark's Hoyas career ended with an airball on a relatively open look. That means that's been four times under JTIII that the team has been eliminated by a double-digit seed in the NCAA Tournament. Alas. On a better note, the Georgetown women survived and advanced over Fresno State on Sunday. Also, Brenda Frese and the Terps women play tonight against Jeff Walz and Louisville. To say the least, these two coaches have a history, as The Post's Gene Wang explains.

Extra Bites

• I'm not huge on space news, but every once in a while NASA releases a cool video like only they can. Here's footage of the northern lights from the International Space Station. Very cool.

• PRI’s “This American Life” show had to deal with quite the embarrassing situation this weekend, but they handled it as well as possible.

• Cooking competition shows are affecting everyone. Even the kids. Look out.

Check out my Facebook fan page, my Twitter feed, or e-mail me at clinton.yates@wpost.com .

Read more on The Root DC

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By  |  11:47 AM ET, 03/19/2012

Categories:  Lunchline

 
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