wpostServer: http://css.washingtonpost.com/wpost2

Most Read: Politics

Read In

Now Viewing: People from around the country looking at Post Politics section

See what's being read across the country ›

Social Surface: Politics

Think Tanked
Posted at 08:28 AM ET, 07/12/2012

What would Mitt Romney do as president? Ending Bush tax cuts and more [AM Briefing]

Brookings’ E.J. Dionne: Could it be that Mitt Romney is correct from a strategic point of view to tell us little about what he’d do as president? . . . There are, of course, excellent civic reasons for a candidate to say where he or she would lead the country. But the debate raging right now in Republican circles is about politics, not civics. Conservatives, including the editors of the Wall Street Journal’s canonical editorial page, are telling Romney that his “insular staff and strategy . . . are slowly squandering an historic opportunity.” In the Weekly Standard, William Kristol fumed: “Is it too much to ask Mitt Romney to get off autopilot and actually think about the race he’s running?” (Washington Post)

Brookings’ William Gale says it’s time to end the Bush era tax cuts and start over: “One might wonder why we need more tax cuts, given that the Congressional Budget Office just released a study showing that tax burdens as a share of income for almost all households were the lowest in 2009 that they have been in decades and given that we face a long-term deficit problem that will require more revenues over time.” (CNN)

“Late last year, as the debate over lifting the debt ceiling threatened to derail the U.S. economy, Congress created sequestration — more than $500 billion in deep and indiscriminate future defense cuts and another half trillion in domestic cuts all designed to be harmful. The idea was that the specter of these cuts would force Congress to reach a grand bargain, solving the long-term fiscal shortfalls, writes Third Way’s Mieke Eoyang. (Politico)

Jamal Abdi: Sanctions at the Genius Bar. (New York Times)

Nancy Brune: Moving to cooler temperatures. (CNAS)

“We are witnessing a seismic shift in global affairs. The shake-up is a perfect storm of political, demographic, and technological change that will soon make the world as we have known it for the last 30 years almost unrecognizable,” writes Victor Davis Hanson. (National Review)

Politico’s Arena asks: Does Jesse Jackson, Jr. owe the public more details?

Room for Debate asks: Does government cause or prevent wildfires? (New York Times)

AEI’s Michael Barone: A muddled outlook for Olympics-ready London. (National Review)

By  |  08:28 AM ET, 07/12/2012

 
Read what others are saying
     

    © 2011 The Washington Post Company