The 113th Congress: Is diversity the answer to gridlock?

The 113th Congress is set to convene at noon Thursday to take over from its beleaguered predecessors — the least productive and least popular Congress in American history.  

After a demoralizing “fiscal cliff” debacle that left both sides of the aisle embittered with political scores left to be settled, the new Congress isn’t likely to sidestep the culture of the immediate past as it takes up potentially even more evocative issues such as gun control, the filibuster and sequestration. 

But if there is reason for optimism that this Congress might be able to get beyond a 12 percent approval rating and record lows of bills passed, it might rest in the fact that the incoming class is more diverse than any other in history. By measure of race, religion, age, gender and sexual orientation, the 113th Congress will be the closest to resembling American diversity thus far. 

Shortly after the 2012 election, ThinkProgress put this handy infographic to show how this incoming class will change the face of Congress. 

Allen McDuffee writes about politics and policy and covered think tanks for The Washington Post from 2011 to 2013. He blogs and hosts a podcast at governmentality.net and is currently working on a book about the influence of think tanks in Washington.

politics

thinktanked

Success! Check your inbox for details. You might also like:

Please enter a valid email address

See all newsletters

Comments
Show Comments
Most Read

politics

thinktanked

Success! Check your inbox for details.

See all newsletters

Next Story
Allen McDuffee · January 3, 2013