Most Read: Opinions

direct signup

Today’s Opinions poll

Would you use an app that tells you the partisan affiliation of products you're considering buying?

Submit
Next
Review your answers and share

Join a Discussion

Weekly schedule, past shows

Tom Toles
Posted at 07:28 AM ET, 06/25/2013

Chaos theory

There are angry demonstrations sweeping the globe as frustrated citizens throng the streets and public squares telling their governments in no uncertain terms that they are fed up with…..

Something. It varies. But they are thronging and demanding that something changes, whatever it is. And we read about this and think that a massive outpouring of participation is a healthy sign of the democratic impulse and it will lead to positive outcomes or even a change in leadership and a new, more responsive and responsible government , unless it leads to something worse, which it might.

We’ve always taken a certain amount of international stability for granted, at least since the rolling cataclysm of the 20th Century, and 19th, and 18th, and 17th, and so on, but we don’t remember those very well anymore because history ended with the invention of the internet and we need to just check our messages here a minute first before we think about that the ground may be shifting under our feet.

We are still trying to figure out what kinds of governments will satisfy the desires of those thronging nationals, at the same time that the autonomy and role of national governments themselves is being eroded away by a growing and spreading global economy. This economy is not really under the control of the democratic process, even as the consequences cascade down to the would-be democrats. There is danger when the polical process fails to keep up with the people and the mismatch between what people want and what their government can deliver, over there in all those other places. Couldn’t happen here, right?

By  |  07:28 AM ET, 06/25/2013

 
Read what others are saying
     

    © 2011 The Washington Post Company