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Tom Toles
Posted at 07:15 AM ET, 02/27/2013

O holy iPhone

Today is feeling like a classic low-zest day, and so I will project my own state of mind and energy-level out there onto the world at large and blame everybody else for the way I happen to be feeling.

How I’m feeling is that we’re missing the opportunity of a lifetime. The opportunity is presented by the threshold-crossing advance of technology. This is, for crying out loud, the moment , the VERY MOMENT ITSELF, that all the futurists of all time have been writing about and waiting for. RIGHT NOW! The moment when technology really CAN transform the entire way we live our lives and the goals we set for ourselves and our society. We could make the world pretty nearly anything we want. And yet, where are we instead? We are at a loss. Paralyzed by something. By everything. Can’t move. Can’t imagine. Can’t think. Our economy is saggy, our government is baggy, our boomers craggy, our indicators laggy. Everything macro is breaking down, while everything micro is flourishing. TOO MUCH MICRO! We are suffering from Nano Brain.

Are we excitedly planning and debating our new world possibilities? No we are all standing still, in the un-meaningful-employment line, thumbing our upgraded little personal communications devices, as if the answers to anything but text messages :-), trivia contests or restaurant locations are going to come out of those. It is our new daily prayer ritual, checking in to review the ever-diminishing returns of the smallest, most novelty-oriented aspects of mushrooming technological possibilities. If you need a metaphor, I can provide one, being as that’s what I do. The other thing that turns inward and gets smaller and smaller is spiraling liquid, as it prepares to go down the drain.

By  |  07:15 AM ET, 02/27/2013

 
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