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Virginia Politics
Posted at 06:20 PM ET, 01/18/2012

Albo’s bingo bill lands on conservative hit list

Virginia’s most conservative lawmakers put out a hit list Tuesday, consisting of about a dozen bills they’d like to kill.


Del. David B. Albo (R-Fairfax) learned Tuesday that conservative members of his own party have targeted a bill he proposed on bingo. (DAVID B. ALBO)
One Republican, Del. David B. Albo (R-Fairfax), managed to make the list with a bill about bingo, of all things.

“I guess they had to be bipartisan,” Albo, a moderate, said with a laugh.

Albo’s bill would allow charities to run “jumbo” bingo, with prizes as high as $1,000, up from the current maximum of $599.

It’s one of 11 bills that the Virginia Conservative Caucus announced it will target during the General Assembly session that began last week. Also in its crosshairs are bills that would: impose a 20-cent tax on plastic bags; increase cigarette taxes; reinstate the estate tax; allow minors to seek protective orders without parental consent; ban public agencies from discriminating against employees on the basis of sexual orientation; provide in-state tuition to undocumented immigrants; and create a health benefits exchange .

Three others relate to the gas tax. One would simply raise the gas tax. Another would raise it and send the proceeds to Metro. The third would convert the gas tax from a flat, per-gallon amount to a percentage rate.

The caucus, co-chaired by Del. Ben L. Cline (R-Rockbridge) and Sen. Mark D. Obenshain (R-Harrisonburg), also announced dozens of bills that it intends to push. The caucus broke them into three categories: “encouraging job creation, progress and opportunity; strengthening and protecting families; and limiting government and defending freedom.”

Among those are proposals to: eliminate the corporate income tax; require that a woman be offered an ultrasound before undergoing an abortion; and lift the one-per-month limit on handgun purchases.

Some of bills on the conservative agenda have passed the House in previous years but died in the Senate. With the upper chamber in GOP control this year, caucus members said they were feeling confident.

“It’s a robust agenda because we’re celebrating the election of a more robust conservative group of legislators in the House and Senate,” Cline said.

This story has been updated.

By  |  06:20 PM ET, 01/18/2012

 
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