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Virginia Politics
Posted at 12:24 PM ET, 10/08/2012

Allen, Cantor draw crowd, protest in Henrico County

More than 6,000 people joined Rep. Eric Cantor (R-Va.) and Republican former governor George Allen for a Saturday afternoon of moon bouncing and politicking in a suburban Richmond swing territory that’s crucial for the GOP next month.


Republican senatorial candidate George Allen campaigned during the Labor Day parade in Buena Vista, Va. (Pat Jarrett - AP)
“Anybody who works for a living and wants a job should be on our side,” Allen, running for U.S. Senate against Democratic former governor Timothy M. Kaine, told the crowd. “And, indeed, anybody who cares about the future of their children and grandchildren should be on our side.... We ought to get about 100 percent of the vote.”

Allen and Cantor were the featured speakers at the Seventh Congressional District Republican Roundup, an annual, country fair-style event at the Snagajob Pavilion at Innisbrook.

The privately owned outdoor concert venue in Glen Allen does not allow visitors to carry concealed weapons, drawing protests from the Virginia Citizens Defense League. The League aimed its protest at Cantor, the House majority leader.

Cantor faces Democratic challenger Wayne Powell, an Army veteran who supported the General Assembly’s decision this year to lift Virginia’s one-per-month limit on handgun purchases. Cantor had voted for the cap nearly 20 years ago as a state lawmaker — earning him the enduring enmity of the Citizens Defense League even as he won the endorsement of the National Rifle Association last week.

Like Allen, Cantor urged the crowd, enjoying free pulled pork, beer and children’s activities, to vote Republican, starting with presidential hopeful Mitt Romney at the top of the ballot.

“We want more money staying in the pockets of the people who earned it so they can put it to work, so more people can go back to work, so Washington can keep to its business of a limited and responsible government in the name and legacy of those great Virginians, James Madison and Thomas Jefferson, who believed that less government means more freedom,” Cantor said.

By  |  12:24 PM ET, 10/08/2012

 
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