wpostServer: http://css.washingtonpost.com/wpost

The Post Most: Local

Virginia Politics
Posted at 05:00 AM ET, 04/11/2012

Obama to open campaign offices in Arlington, Falls Church

While Republicans continue to search for a nominee for the top of the ticket, President Obama is quickly building his campaign in the swing state of Virginia.
President Barack Obama (BRENDAN SMIALOWSKI/AFP/Getty Images)

This weekend, the president’s reelection campaign will open three more campaign offices. That’s numbers 11, 12 and 13 for those who have lost count.

On Saturday, the campaign will open offices in Falls Church and Suffolk. On Sunday, it will do the same in Arlington.

Former Democratic National Committee chairman, businessman and presumed 2013 gubernatorial candidate Terry McAuliffe will be at the Suffolk and Arlington grand openings. Virginia native Yohannes Abraham, Obama’s deputy national political director, will be in Falls Church.

The campaign already has opened 10 offices: Fairfax, Newport News, Petersburg, Fredericksburg, Charlottesville, Danville, Virginia Beach, Prince William and Loudoun. Richmond is home to the headquarters.

Former Massachusetts governor Mitt Romney, expected to be the Republican nominee after former senator Rick Santorum dropped out of the race Tuesday, has no presence in Virginia. But the the GOP’s coordinated campaign — dubbed the 2012 Virginia Victory Campaign — has seven offices that have remained open since 2010.

The Obama campaign has dozens of staffers in every region of the state, including Northern Virginia, some of whom have been here for more than two years through Organizing for America, a Democratic National Committee community organizing project. Since the launch of Obama’s reelection campaign last April, volunteers have reached out to over 500,000 Virginians on the phones and at the doors.

In 2008, Obama became the first Democratic presidential candidate to carry Virginia in 44 years, but in the years since, Democrats have lost ground. The GOP now controls all of Richmond and holds a majority of Virginia’s congressional delegation.

Obama and Sen. John McCain (R-Ariz.) worked hard for Virginia’s 13 electoral votes four years ago, making the state a must-win for the first time in decades. Both candidates, as well as numerous surrogates, made repeated visits to the state and flooded airwaves and mailboxes with advertisements.

Obama opened almost 50 offices, even in sparsely populated regions, and dispatched more than 250 paid staffers and recruited thousands of volunteers to knock on doors across the state.

Follow me on Twitter: anitakumar01

By  |  05:00 AM ET, 04/11/2012

 
Read what others are saying
     

    © 2011 The Washington Post Company