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Virginia Politics
Posted at 08:05 AM ET, 09/14/2011

Pr. William board allocates funds for flood victims

Prince William County supervisors budgeted $40,000 to the American Red Cross on Tuesday to help residents impacted by Tropical Storm Lee.

More than 150 Woodbridge area residents are homeless after floodwaters engulfed two mobile home communities on Thursday. Holly Acres, off Route 1, was hit the hardest; county officials have condemned almost 70 of the 108 mobile homes in the trailer park. About 15 businesses were also impacted, and residents in an apartment complex were also temporarily displaced when a retaining wall failed, county officials said.

The funding allocated by the board will go to the Prince William Chapter of the American Red Cross. The money is from proffers paid by the development community to support affordable housing in Prince William.

County officials, along with the Red Cross, have set up a makeshift shelter in Woodbridge where almost 40 families are staying. The shelter, however, is set to close Friday and the county is not responsible for providing long-term homes, county officials said.

Federal Emergency Management Agency and Small Business Association officials are scheduled to be in Prince William on Thursday to assess the damage, said Pat Collins, Prince William’s emergency service’s coordinator. The assessment team will look at damage to individual homes, county infrastructure and utilities.

In order to receive federal funding, the state needs to incur $10.4 million worth of damage, and Prince William needs to incur $1.3 million in damage, Collins said. Insured damage does not qualify for assistance. If the funding threshold is met, Gov. Bob McDonnell will make a request to President Obama through FEMA for federal aid.

Once FEMA signs off, Obama will sign off on a presidential disaster declaration, Collins said.

During Tuesday’s afternoon board meeting, dozens of residents came before supervisors, pleading for help. The Holly Acres park serves mainly low-income, Hispanic residents, most of whom owned little more than what was in their trailers when the flood hit. Many people lost everything.

By  |  08:05 AM ET, 09/14/2011

 
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