Watch what happens when Republican congressmen have to explain their immigration position to actual immigrants

Last Thursday, 11-year-old Josie Molina, whose father is undocumented, asked her Congressman — the embattled Rep. Scott DesJarlais (R-TN) — what he would do to help her father stay in the U.S. DesJarlais answered, basically, "Nothing":

Molina is hardly alone. She is one of a number of family members of undocumented immigrants to challenge Republicans in town halls this recess. Rep. Mo Brooks (R-AL), for example, got a question from a six-year-old girl who is a U.S. citizen but who has relatives who are undocumented:

Meanwhile, in Illinois a woman with family members who've been undocumented immigrants in the U.S. for 13 years asked Rep. Aaron Schock (R-IL) what exactly he means when he says he supports a pathway to citizenship, and Schock answered sympathetically:

Rep. Tom Reed (R-NY) was asked a few days ago if he would be willing to adopt U.S. citizen children of undocumented parents:

Late in July, Rep. Paul Ryan (R-WI) faced questions about the anti-immigration rhetoric of Rep. Steve King (R-IA), which he was forced to repudiate:

It was part of a number of challenges Ryan faced from pro-immigration advocates:

In early August, Rep. Renee Elmers (R-NC) faced pro-immigration reform protestors who marched through the city of Asheboro, telling them at the culmination of their march that she backs a pathway to citizenship:

Members of undocumented families — such as Dulce Elias, who immigrated with her family at 3 — were a major presence at a town hall that Rep. Bob Goodlatte (R-VA), who as House Judiciary Committee chair is taking lead on immigration legislation in the House, held on Monday:

A forum in Patterson, CA was totally dominated by immigration activists, who got Rep. Jeff Denham (R-CA) to commit to supporting a pathway to citizenship:

Rep. Steve Southerland (R-FL) received a question from Juan Espinoza, a DREAMer who immigrated from Peru to America when he was four:

Rep. Blake Farenthold (R-TX) received 10,000 petitions from a group of supporters of immigration reform at his office in Corpus Christi:

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