poli-sci

The president is, to a surprising degree, above petty and parochial concerns.

  • Ezra Klein
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  • Aug 29, 2013
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Larry Bartels is one of my favorite political scientists for his relentless efforts to cut through emotional debates with cold, hard data. What happened?

  • Ezra Klein
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  • Aug 14, 2013
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Like other emerging political science research, we show that voters don’t hold women and men to different standards on the campaign trail -- even when it comes to looks.

  • Danny Hayes and Jennifer L. Lawless
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  • Jun 23, 2013
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Emory political scientist Joanna Shepherd finds that judges who get business donations for their campaigns tend to lean in business's favor.

  • Dylan Matthews
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  • Jun 11, 2013
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The post-2102 narrative had a circular logic to it: Obama won because of his superior campaign, and we know that his campaign was superior because he won.

Thinking about 60s is a great way to understand what polarization means -- and doesn't mean -- today.

  • Ezra Klein
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  • Apr 17, 2013
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About 73 percent of scandal-tainted incumbents make it to the general election. Bad behavior hurts, although it is far from a political death sentence.

What’s striking about this debate is how detached it is from some simple facts about the 2012 election—facts that suggest that the Republican Party doesn’t need an overhaul.

C'mon, we've known voters love abstract spending cuts and specific spending programs for 40 years now. So why are we still running these kinds of polls?

  • Ezra Klein
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  • Mar 18, 2013
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Georgetown professor Danny Hayes analyzed nightly news coverage of immigration reform in 2007. Here's what he found.

It's a common view of what's wrong with American politics: Gerrymandering has created a bunch of safe-seat legislators whp drift further and further to the ideological extremes. But it's not true.

The president's inaugural address probably won't much matter come, say, next Thursday. And on the off-chance that it does, it will probably make President Obama's life harder rather than easier.

  • Ezra Klein
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  • Jan 22, 2013
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A close look at the ads from the 2012 campaign shows that most voters just didn't care.

Democrats are hoping that the chaos evident during the fiscal cliff negotiations will come back and bite House Republicans in the 2014 midterm election. Are they right?

  • Ezra Klein
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  • Jan 13, 2013
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When John Boehner told Harry Reid to "go f--- yourself," it was more than just an outburst. It was insight into a crucial driver of party polarization.

A study of 51,762 bills found a few magic words that seemed to help legislation get through Congress, and a few not-so-magic words that seemed to doom its prospects. Here they are.

Whether politicians in Washington take up the issue in a serious way will determine how quickly gun control recedes from the news pages.

Once we account for population and basic ethnic/racial demographics, counties that are home to Big Three plants just didn't vote very differently from similar counties that are not.

Consider this poll question: “When you think of people who are Republicans, what type of person comes to mind?” 31 percent picked words like “wealthy” and “business executive” while only 6 percent chose “working class” and its kindred.

When the 113th Congress convenes in January, women will occupy more seats than ever before. Why did women do so well in 2012? Because gender bias – either by the media or the voters – is no longer the impediment to female candidates that it once was.

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