political-science

Sorry Democrats, you’re likely to lose House seats in 2014

A new House forecast model says Democrats will lose five House seats next year.

  • Ezra Klein
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  • Dec 5, 2013
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What Toronto’s crack-smoking mayor can teach us about political science

How has scandal-ridden Rob Ford become so popular? A political scientist explains.

  • Brad Plumer
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  • Nov 6, 2013
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Just knowing about fact-checkers makes politicians less likely to lie

Being warned of PolitiFact's presence reduces a candidate's likelihood of getting a bad grade from the group by 55 percent.

  • Dylan Matthews
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  • Oct 8, 2013
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The lesson of the food stamps vote: Party is all that matters now

How many of the Congress members' constituents used food stamps didn't matter at all.

  • Dylan Matthews
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  • Sep 20, 2013
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What political scientists can tell us about war, Syria and Congress

For starters: It's not true that "politics stops at the water's edge."

  • Brad Plumer
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  • Sep 3, 2013
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Do presidents really reward the states that voted them into office?

The president is, to a surprising degree, above petty and parochial concerns.

  • Ezra Klein
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  • Aug 29, 2013
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How Obama demobilized the antiwar movement

Since Obama's election as president, many Democrats have stopped showing up for antiwar protests.

  • Brad Plumer
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  • Aug 29, 2013
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Larry Bartels confuses Washington and the economy

Larry Bartels is one of my favorite political scientists for his relentless efforts to cut through emotional debates with cold, hard data. What happened?

  • Ezra Klein
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  • Aug 14, 2013
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We asked science if Eliot Spitzer could win. It said yes.

A recent study found that within four years, scandal-ridden House members do as well as their squeaky-clean colleagues.

  • Dylan Matthews
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  • Jul 8, 2013
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When businesses give judges money, they usually get the rulings they want

Emory political scientist Joanna Shepherd finds that judges who get business donations for their campaigns tend to lean in business's favor.

  • Dylan Matthews
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  • Jun 11, 2013
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The people have taken over American politics, and they hate it

The more Americans participate in their political system, the angrier and more disillusioned they become.

  • Ezra Klein
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  • Jun 6, 2013
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Republicans and Democrats can’t even agree on baby names

Republicans go for traditional names with hard consonants. Liberals like more unique names with softer sounds.

If you pay them money, partisans will tell you the truth

When you ask Democrats and Republicans basic factual questions about politics, they tend to get questions wrong in a way that helps their side. But if they get paid to be right, they don't.

  • Dylan Matthews
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  • Jun 3, 2013
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Here’s why remote state capitals are often more corrupt

A new working paper finds that U.S. state capitals that are remote from population centers tend to be more corrupt — possibly due to less media coverage.

  • Brad Plumer
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  • May 16, 2013
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A new study says politicians don’t favor the rich. That’s debatable.

Do we really live in the "United States of Google, Verizon" or do the poor have a say? The literature's split.

  • Dylan Matthews
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  • May 7, 2013
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One study explains why it’s tough to pass liberal laws

Liberal state legislators systematically overestimate how conservative their constituents are. And conservative ones basically think their districts are full of Jim DeMints.

  • Dylan Matthews
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  • Mar 4, 2013
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Has the American Bar Association kept our judges white and male?

The American Bar Association issues influential ratings of potential judicial nominees. The best way to get a bad rating is to be a racial minority or a woman.

  • Dylan Matthews
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  • Feb 28, 2013
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Why Frank Underwood’s coup wouldn’t have worked

This post spoils a medium-sized plot point midway though the Netflix drama, House of Cards. If you don't want the spoiler, stop reading. You've been warned.

  • Ezra Klein
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  • Feb 26, 2013
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State of the Union addresses rarely have much impact

Political scientists have found that SOTU addresses rarely move the president's approval ratings and only have a slight effect on framing various policy issues. One reason? Few people are watching them.

  • Brad Plumer
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  • Feb 12, 2013
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The political science of papal elections

John Paul II used the nuclear option. But Benedict brought back the filibuster.

  • Dylan Matthews
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  • Feb 11, 2013
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