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Nelson Mandela dies

Nelson Mandela, the anti-apartheid crusader and former South African president, died Dec. 5 at 95. We’re bringing you live updates here.

mandela mourner

A well-wisher writes on a poster in the street outside Mandela’s old house in Soweto, Johannesburg. (Ben Curtis/AP)

TIMELINE: The life of Nelson Mandela

LIVE REACTION: Remembering Mandela

PHOTOS: An extraordinary life

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Front pages from around the world

Mandela’s death is obviously the leading story in newspapers around the world today, with front pages dominated by photos of him and stories about his life and impact.

See more front pages here.

Mark Berman
December 6, 7:39 am
  • Mark Berman December 6, 7:39 am

Recollections from the author of 'Playing the Enemy'

John Carlin wrote “Playing the Enemy,” the book that would serve as the inspiration for Clint Eastwood’s 2009 film “Invictus.” Carlin, who was the London Independent’s South African bureau chief between 1989 and 1995, wrote about what it was like covering Mandela:

With every other political enemy, or former enemy, that Mandela encountered, he was, I repeat, unfailingly courteous and respectful. Apart from those who worked for him directly in the presidential offices, I have spoken to the former head of the apartheid intelligence service, the former minister of justice, a former general who planned for some months to lead a terrorist movement of the far right against Mandela’s democratic enterprise. All three ended up adoring him, describing him as they might a cherished relative. The former intelligence chief referred to him not as “Mandela,” but as “the old man,” as if he were talking about his own father.

Mark Berman
December 6, 8:06 am
  • Mark Berman December 6, 8:06 am

World leaders react

World leaders from Johannesburg to the White House reacted to Mandela’s death, paying tribute in the hours after the news was announced:

Mark Berman
December 6, 8:08 am
  • Mark Berman December 6, 8:08 am

A mourning nation

mandela mourners in houghton

Mourners place candles outside Mandela’s home in Houghton. (Reuters)

In a dispatch from Johannesburg, The Economist surveyed the mood of a crowd outside Mandela’s home in Houghton, one of the city’s suburbs:

The mood among the pilgrims to Houghton, as in the wider country, was mixed. Candles were lit in mourning but there were also songs in celebration of a remarkable life. Asked on a popular talk-radio show about his feelings, a minister who had served under Mr Mandela during his first and only term as president until 1999, said he was “sad, relieved and elated”. It is a strange mix of emotions but a telling one.

Mark Berman
December 6, 8:10 am
  • Mark Berman December 6, 8:10 am

His struggle in posters

The New York Times has a look at the posters used over the years as part of a global anti-apartheid campaign.

Mark Berman
December 6, 8:23 am
  • Mark Berman December 6, 8:23 am

Desmond Tutu remembers Mandela

Desmond Tutu, archbishop emeritus of Cape Town, wrote about Mandela’s moral courage for On Faith:

Can you imagine what would have happened to us had Nelson Mandela emerged from prison in 1990 bristling with resentment at the gross miscarriage of justice that had occurred in the Rivonia trial? Can you imagine where South Africa would be today had he been consumed by a lust for revenge, to want to pay back for all the humiliations and all the agony that he and his people had suffered at the hands of their white oppressors?

Tutu  leads prayer service for Mandela

Archbishop Emeritus Desmond Tutu, right, leads a prayer service Friday. (AP)

Instead the world was amazed, indeed awed, by the unexpectedly peaceful transition of 1994, followed not by an orgy of revenge and retribution but by the wonder of forgiveness and reconciliation epitomized in the processes of the Truth & Reconciliation Commission.

Mark Berman
December 6, 8:25 am
  • Mark Berman December 6, 8:25 am

Funeral set for Dec. 15

Mandela’s funeral will be held on Dec. 15, South African President Jacob Zuma announced Friday. Zuma said that there would be a “national week of mourning” between then and now, The Post’s Michael Birnbaum reports.

Mark Berman
December 6, 8:26 am
  • Mark Berman December 6, 8:26 am

Grief, admiration worldwide

mandela mourner

A well-wisher writes on a poster in the street outside Mandela’s old house in Soweto, Johannesburg. (Ben Curtis/AP)

The Post’s Sudarsan Raghavan is in Johannesburg, where crowds have gathered outside Mandela’s home in a nearby suburb, and makeshift tributes are piled against trees and buildings. Mandela’s face appeared on the front pages of newspapers the world over, his name was invoked in tributes on social media, and people gathered to mourn publicly as others reflected privately. Head here for our latest story.

Mark Berman
December 6, 8:44 am
  • Mark Berman December 6, 8:44 am

Children recite Mandela's famous words

Mandela’s most famous speech was his courtroom address where he called free and equal society “an ideal for which I am prepared to die.”

Quartz asked children at Rosebank Primary School in Johannesburg to recite part of this speech:

Mark Berman
December 6, 9:03 am
  • Mark Berman December 6, 9:03 am

Gorbachev, Putin praise Mandela's life

World leaders continued to recall Mandela on Friday.

“I knew Nelson Mandela very well,” former Soviet president Mikhail Gorbachev told the Interfax news agency on Friday. “He was an amazing man, who lived a hard and long life. One-third of his life took place in very harsh conditions. He contributed a huge amount to the fight against the consequences of apartheid. He did a lot for mankind, and he will be remembered not only by the people of his country, but also by people worldwide.”

Gorbachev went on to say that Mandela set “a great example for thinking people.”

“He was an amazing, clever, and talented statesman,” Gorbachev said. “He told me many times that the perestroika in the U.S.S.R. did a lot to help his country get rid of apartheid.”

Russian President Vladimir Putin sent a note of condolence to Jacob Zuma, the South African president, noting that “having endured difficult sufferings, Mandela remained faithful to the ideals of humanism and justice until the end of his life.”

Mark Berman
December 6, 9:06 am
  • Mark Berman December 6, 9:06 am
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