The world through the lens of Associated Press photographer Anja Niedringhaus

Photojournalist Anja Niedringhaus was killled and her colleague Kathy Gannon wounded when an Afghan police officer opened fire on their car. (AP)

Pulitzer prize-winning photographer Anja Niedringhaus was shot and killed by an Afghan police officer while she was traveling with a reporter in Afghanistan's Khost province in a convoy with election workers. Reporter Kathy Gannon, who was wounded in the attack, is reported to be in stable condition.

Niedringhaus, a photographer for the Associated Press, covered conflicts from Bosnia to Afghanistan for the last two decades, and in 2005, she was awarded the Pulitzer prize as part of a team of AP photographers covering the war in Iraq. She photographed the aftermath of the Sept. 11 attacks in New York City, and then headed to the coalition forces' battle with Taliban fighters in Afghanistan.

“Anja and Kathy together have spent years in Afghanistan covering the conflict and the people there. Anja was a vibrant, dynamic journalist well-loved for her insightful photographs, her warm heart and joy for life. We are heartbroken at her loss,” AP Executive Editor Kathleen Carroll said in a statement issued by the wire service.

(Read: Journalists pay tribute to AP colleagues who were shot in Afghanistan.)

Two years ago, in a reflection about her work for Neiman Reports, Niedringhaus said that covering conflict and war is the essence of journalism for her.

"My assignment, regardless of the era, is about people—civilians and soldiers," she wrote. "The legacy of any photographer is her or his ability to capture the moment, to record history. For me it is about showing the struggle and survival of the individual."

Here are some of the images captured by Anja Niedringhaus over the years.


An Afghan man with his five children on his motorbike pays money to enter a park in Kandahar, southern Afghanistan, on Nov. 1, 2013.

An Afghan boy on a donkey reacts as Canadian soldiers with the 1st RCR Battle Group, The Royal Canadian Regiment, patrol in Salavat, southwest of Kandahar, Afghanistan., on Sept. 11, 2010.

Lance Cpl. Blas Trevino of the 1st Battalion, 5th Marines, clinches his Rosary beads as he is treated by U.S. Army flight medic Sgt. Joe Campbell after being rescued onto a medevac helicopter from the U.S. Army's Task Force Lift "Dust Off", Charlie Company 1-214 Aviation Regiment in Afghanistan, on June 11, 2011.

Afghan policemen run to jump on their car as Taliban militants attacked the main Afghan election commission's headquarters on the outskirts of Kabul, Afghanistan, firing on the compound with rocket-propelled grenades and heavy machine guns from a house outside its perimeter wall, on March 29, 2014.

An Afghan special forces soldier, left, is kissed by an Afghan man after the commandos took over control of an election office after the Taliban launched an assault with a suicide bomber detonating his vehicle outside an election office in Kabul, Afghanistan on March 25, 2014.

Ethnic Albanian refugee children run as the first helicopters with humanitarian aid, supplied by the French army, arrive next to a makeshift refugee camp near Kukes, northern Albania on April 4, 1999.

An Albanian Kosovar refugee crosses with other male refugees from Yugoslavia into Albania in Morina, on May 29, 1999.

A woman reacts while sitting in a New York taxi as different television networks call the presidential race for Barack Obama, in New York, on Nov. 4, 2008.

A German soldier lifts weights at his combat outpost in Char Darah, outside Kunduz, Afghanistan, on Sept. 17, 2011.

A Pakistani stands atop the 8000-foot mountain during a patrol near his outpost, Kalpani Base, on the Pakistan-Afghan border, on Feb. 17, 2012.

Hundreds of U.S. Marines gather at Camp Commando in the Kuwait desert during a Christmas eve visit by Santa Claus, on Nov. 24, 2002.

See more images by Niedringhaus below.

Anup Kaphle is the Post's digital foreign editor. He has an M.S. degree in journalism from Columbia University. Follow him on Twitter and Facebook.
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