Default fuels uncertainty in Argentina

(David Fernandez / EPA)

Stocks fell sharply in Argentina as the country entered into economic uncertainty with its second default in 13 years, one forced upon it by New York hedge funds with the backing of U.S. courts.

Latest News

At Georgetown University, a summer school for budding entrepreneurs

At Georgetown University, a summer school for budding entrepreneurs

Seven student-created companies from Georgetown’s summer start-up program pitched their young ventures at 1776 on Wednesday night.

Truland bankruptcy could delay GWU construction

Electrical company was subcontractor for project; closure expected to cause expensive delays.

Target names Pepsi's Cornell as chairman, CEO

Target names Pepsi's Cornell as chairman, CEO

Target is bringing in an outsider as its CEO for the first time as the retailer fights to redefine itself to American shoppers.

Obama cracks down on labor breaches by contractors

Obama cracks down on labor breaches by contractors

Some companies that earn billions of dollars as government contractors are among the worst violators of U.S. labor laws, yet year after year they keep winning new contracts.

Panasonic, Tesla to build big U.S. battery plant

Panasonic, Tesla to build big U.S. battery plant

American electric car maker Tesla is teaming up with Japanese electronics company Panasonic to build a battery manufacturing plant in the U.S. expected to create 6,500 jobs.

MicroStrategy outlines plans for executive changes, cuts

The Tysons Corner company held its first conference call with investors, analysts in nearly a decade

Columnists

Michelle Singletary

Michelle Singletary

Targeting scams against the elderly

Scammers go after senior citizens, who don’t have as much time as the young to recover lost money.

Barry Ritholtz

Barry Ritholtz

So you’re the world’s greatest trader? Taxes will fix that.

Traders pay a tax of 30 percent or more on short-term capital gains. Passive indexers come out ahead.

Thomas Heath

Thomas Heath

Dealmaker quits Carlyle and big future to chase a dream

Johnson charts a path from Anacostia to Carlyle, with stops at Princeton and Harvard, then walks away.

Market News

US stocks open lower; Yum Brands sinks

Stocks are opening lower as investors react to more disappointing earnings from companies.

Wonkblog

More and more Americans are living with the ‘double burden’ of concentrated poverty

The number of high-poverty “distressed” neighborhoods — and the share of the poor living in them — has grown since 2000.

Suddenly, Obamacare is more unpopular than ever

Suddenly, Obamacare is more unpopular than ever

The law scores a record low in a key health-care poll. But is it just a blip?

What that $34 overdraft fee is really costing you

What that $34 overdraft fee is really costing you

CFPB said overdrafts continue to impose heavy costs on consumers who have low account balances.

More from Wonkblog

On Leadership

How Target’s new CEO can succeed as an outsider

How Target’s new CEO can succeed as an outsider

Brian Cornell will face pressure to hurry up and fix problems at the retailer. But research shows he shouldn’t rush too much.

Labor Secretary Tom Perez on leadership

Labor Secretary Tom Perez on leadership

“Government can and should lead is in workplace flexibility.“

A Hippocratic oath for bankers?

A Hippocratic oath for bankers?

A British think tank has proposed that bankers take a pledge to uphold ethical standards.

More from On Leadership

The Switch

Why did all these countries start asking for Twitter’s user data?

Why did all these countries start asking for Twitter’s user data?

Twitter’s transparency report reveals that a growing number of countries want access to user information for the first time. What explains the spread?

Is the Wiretappers’ Ball hosting guests from repressive regimes?

Is the Wiretappers’ Ball hosting guests from repressive regimes?

A researcher has raised questions about whether ISS World allowed the attendance of people from countries engaging in human rights abuses.

This Republican is trying to use Uber to sell his highway funding plan

This Republican is trying to use Uber to sell his highway funding plan

Sen. Mike Lee was attempting to add a customer service spin to the principle of devolution.

More from The Switch