Immixgroup adds ‘busy season’ benefits

August 19, 2012

Company: ImmixGroup.

Location: McLean.

Employees: About 252 locally; 264 nationwide.

September is a big month at ImmixGroup, a firm that facilitates business between technology companies and the government. Because Sept. 30 marks the end of the fiscal year for federal agencies, the company receives a deluge of under-the-wire orders in the weeks immediately preceding the deadline.

Its president, Art Richer, said the rush is analogous to what retailers experience during December’s holiday shopping season. In fact, he said his company does 15 to 20 percent of its annual business in the single week before the cutoff date.

The increased workload means unusually long hours for employees, and so the McLean-based firm adds a host of “busy season” benefits to make late nights at the office more tolerable.

Each September, the company converts its 2,000-square foot training center into a themed recreation room. Last year’s set-up included table tennis and foosball tables and a place to play Xbox and Nintendo Wii. This year, they’re planning a Las Vegas theme in which workers will be able to use fake money to play blackjack, poker, roulette and other games. At the end, the person with the most money can choose from a selection of prizes, such as a gift card, a half-day off from work or even get his or her car washed by one of the company’s vice presidents.

“We try to inject a little bit of fun into this time of year,” Richer said. The perks “keep people loose so they’re happy and friendly with the customers.”

The activities are “not only a good stress reliever for everybody, but also a good bonding experience,” agreed Chris Carroccio, a senior account manager.

During the week just prior to deadline, the company foots the bill for three meals a day for the staff.

Carroccio’s favorite benefit is one that typically comes on the final day of the company’s big push: The chance to get a free massage. This year, employees will be able to sign up for 20-minute sessions with one of six massage therapists that will be scattered about the office.

Sarah Halzack is The Washington Post's national retail reporter. She has previously covered the local job market and the business of talent and hiring. She has also served as a Web producer for business and economic news.
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