A Florida case study in surgical necessity

How the hospital fees for a single procedure grew from $47 million to $2 billion a year, adjusted for inflation, in Florida. Read related article.

A Florida case study in surgical necessity
NOTE: Professional societies and other experts rule out or discourage the routine use of spinal fusion for several common problems of the lower back — stenosis, herniated discs and disc degeneration — when there are no accompanying problems of spinal instability or deformity. | Source: Washington Post analysis of Florida Inpatient Hospital Discharge Data for 1992, 1996, 2000, 2004, 2008 and 2012. | Dan Keating and Cristina Rivero/The Washington Post. Published on October 27, 2013, 6:06 p.m.

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