Software AG unveils data software for Internet of Things

Software AG, a Frankfurt-based firm whose North American headquarters are in Reston, has released a new product intended to manage data created by the Internet of Things — a term for a connected network of sensors, physical objects and devices.

It’s the company’s first foray into the network, which Gartner predicts will involve 26 billion connected objects by the year 2020. Software AG’s “Internet of Things Solutions Accelerator” displays real-time analytics involving information generated by the devices making up the Internet of Things.

Companies interested in building or using the Internet of Things network “struggle with the challenge of how they can manage, control, and act upon the anticipated tsunami of data and events that all this will undoubtedly create,” John Crupi, Software AG’s vice president of visual analytics, said in a statement.

The Washington area could be a particularly receptive market for this kind of software, Crupi said in an interview.

“Really a lot of the sensor technology lets you optimize and be more efficient, whether it’s self-driving cars to smart roads to smart highways to smart cars that are working together and communicating and becoming more fuel efficient,” Crupi said.

Government contractors eager to reduce costs by increasing efficiency may be looking for software that can manage data from disparate systems, he explained. The rapidly declining cost of basic sensors makes it easier for companies to monitor appliances or devices and add them to the Internet of Things, Crupi added.

Software AG, which has more than 5,000 employees in 70 countries, may soon hire more Internet of Things experts to support the new products, Crupi said. The company may also hire tech experts to help build Internet of Things software for specific markets — healthcare or power and oil, for instance.

“Analytics really are tuned toward specific domains means you can’t really be general purpose,” he said. “[Software AG’s products] are really accelerators to help you get maybe 30, 40, 60 percent of the way to your solution, and customize the last part.”

Mohana Ravindranath covers IT and small business for the Washington Post and its weekly Capital Business publication.
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