Is the Wiretappers’ Ball hosting guests from repressive regimes?

Promotion brochure from an event

A researcher has raised questions about whether ISS World allowed the attendance of people from countries engaging in human rights abuses.

More Technology News

Why did all these countries start asking for Twitter’s user data?

Why did all these countries start asking for Twitter’s user data?

Twitter’s transparency report reveals that a growing number of countries want access to user information for the first time. What explains the spread?

Panasonic, Tesla to build ‘gigafactory’

Panasonic, Tesla to build ‘gigafactory’

American electric car maker Tesla is teaming up with Japanese electronics company Panasonic to build a battery manufacturing plant in the U.S.

This Republican is trying to use Uber to sell his highway funding plan

This Republican is trying to use Uber to sell his highway funding plan

Sen. Mike Lee was attempting to add a customer service spin to the principle of devolution.

Inside the stressed-out, time-crunched patent examiner workforce

Inside the stressed-out, time-crunched patent examiner workforce

As patent examiners get promoted, they get less time to review patent applications, which leads them to approve more patents but at the risk of lowering patent quality, according to a new study.

Authors group pushes for NSA reform, while there’s still time

Authors group pushes for NSA reform, while there’s still time

Suzanne Nossel, executive director of PEN American Center, said writers must speak out against overreaching surveillance.

Verizon’s slowing down data for some of its heaviest users. And the FCC is calling them out on it.

Verizon’s slowing down data for some of its heaviest users. And the FCC is calling them out on it.

The letter also offers a broader signal about the FCC’s thinking on net neutrality.

Think the Supreme Court protected your cellphone from warrantless searches? Think again.

Think the Supreme Court protected your cellphone from warrantless searches? Think again.

Even after the Court’s ruling on mobile privacy this year, travelers are still subject to warrantless searches at the border and airports.

Video

Britain testing driverless cars on roads

Britain testing driverless cars on roads

British officials said on Wednesday that driverless cars will be tested on roads in as many as three cities in a trial program set to begin in January. Officials said the tests will last up to three years.

Amazon’s new attack on Hachette touts the benefits of cheaper e-books

Amazon’s new attack on Hachette touts the benefits of cheaper e-books

The online retailer wants to lower e-book prices -- a move it claims will benefit the entire publishing industry.

How patent reform’s fraught politics have left USPTO still without a boss

How patent reform’s fraught politics have left USPTO still without a boss

The once-sleepy agency has quickly become a battleground for who will control how government and innovation intersect in the US.

Twitter shares jump on user and revenue growth, although it’s still not turning a profit

Twitter shares jump on user and revenue growth, although it’s still not turning a profit

In the short-term, at least, the firm manages to fight off doubts that it would be unable to make money following its decision to go public last year.

Is Facebook learning to embrace privacy?

Is Facebook learning to embrace privacy?

Facebook may be looking at privacy more as an opportunity than as an obstacle these days.

AT&T has an interconnection deal with Netflix for faster, smoother video

AT&T has an interconnection deal with Netflix for faster, smoother video

The streaming video company says its agreement was reached in May and is now rolling out to consumers.

You’ll soon need a cable account to sit and watch C-SPAN all day online

You’ll soon need a cable account to sit and watch C-SPAN all day online

The changes sweeping through the media business have not left C-SPAN untouched.

How the history of electricity explains municipal broadband

How the history of electricity explains municipal broadband

Skeptics of publicly owned broadband say the federal government has no authority to intervene in states on behalf of cities. But the New Deal offers at least one precedent.

Dance parties and playground games are as much a part of ‘Destiny’ as its core gameplay

Dance parties and playground games are as much a part of ‘Destiny’ as its core gameplay

Bungie’s delighted that players took lots of time to goof off during the “Destiny” beta. That’s exactly what they wanted.

Smartshoes put Google Maps at your feet and vibrate to tell you where to go

Smartshoes put Google Maps at your feet and vibrate to tell you where to go

The Bluetooth-enabled Lechal shoes will help visually impaired individuals to navigate.

The Senate has another go at NSA surveillance reform

The Senate has another go at NSA surveillance reform

A new version of the USA Freedom Act has been introduced in the Senate.

The super PAC to end super PACs leaps into New Hampshire and Iowa

The super PAC to end super PACs leaps into New Hampshire and Iowa

Larry Lessig’s Mayday PAC has announced the first two candidates that it’s backing for the midterms. Here’s who they are.

The Switch turns one -- and we’re having a party tonight!

The Switch turns one -- and we’re having a party tonight!

Come to our reader meet up July 29, 2014 in Washington, D.C.

Amazon adds a YouTube-like “Video Shorts” section that turns video browsing into a shopping opportunity

Amazon adds a YouTube-like “Video Shorts” section that turns video browsing into a shopping opportunity

A new component of Amazon’s Instant Video Web site, called Video Shorts, offers free video browsing and chance to purchase items related to the video clips.

Switchboard: What it’s like to be a Comcast customer service rep

Switchboard: What it’s like to be a Comcast customer service rep

Your morning helping of hand-picked stories from The Switch team.

The FTC is expanding the war on bogus cellphone charges

The FTC is expanding the war on bogus cellphone charges

Up to 20 million people a year are affected by “mobile cramming,” according to a federal study. Now the FTC is laying out what wireless carriers should do to stop it.

Senators question wisdom of U.S. government office that exists to sell free technical reports

Senators question wisdom of U.S. government office that exists to sell free technical reports

The Internet has threatened to turn NTIS from a useful service into a boondoggle.