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Amazon Kindle Fire HD 8.9 gets a one-day discount

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Amazon’s Kindle Fire HD has been on the market just under a month, but the company has already cut the price of the tablet by $50 for a one-day deal Monday.

That brings the price of the WiFi 8.9-inch tablet from a starting price of $299.99 to $249.99, and the price of the 4G LTE-enabled tablet to $499 to $449.

To get the deal, shoppers have to type the code “FIREHD89” into the promotions box at check-out.

Amazon hasn’t released any sales figures on the Kindle Fire HD 8.9 — in fact, it rarely releases any specific sales numbers for its Kindle models — so it’s not clear if this is an effort to boost lagging sales or just a swell holiday deal.

Amazon has said that today’s offer has a limited supply, though the promotion still hadn’t sold out as of 4 p.m.

Actually, it’s a very good day for anyone who has a bibliophile on their list. Another e-reader, the Barnes and Noble Nook Simple Touch, got a permanent price slash. The reader is now $79, down from a previously discounted price of $99.

Tablets and e-readers are topping many holiday lists this year, particularly as the prices on them drop.

The site Techbargains recently published an infographic showing that tablets are the most-wanted gift this year and that 24 percent of shoppers looking for tablets are interested in the Kindle Fire HD. The most-wanted tablet, according to the survey, is the Google Nexus 7 with 33 percent, followed by a 30 percent slice of the market for Apple’s iPad and a 24 percent share for the iPad mini.

One-fifth of shoppers said they’re interested in getting themselves a tablet along with someone else. About 34 percent said they’re only giving themselves a tablet this year; 46 percent are in a more giving mood with plans to wrap a tablet up for someone else.

Related stories: Amazon introduces kid-focused service Wal-Mart drops Amazon Kindle products Big-box stores attempt to lure online shoppers Sign up today to receive #thecircuit, a daily roundup by Hayley Tsukayama of the latest tech policy news from Washington and how it is shaping business, entertainment and science.

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