Boston tech community launches fundraising effort for blast victims

April 16, 2013

The Boston technology community has stepped up to help following the blasts at the Boston Marathon that left three dead and at least 140 others injured.

Technology Underwriting the Greater Good, or TUGG, has teamed up with another Boston-based tech company, fundraise.com, to collect $50,000 to support programs for those affected by the explosions.

The effort is hosted on fundraise.com, with the funds going to organizations including the Red Cross and the city’s Children’s Hospital, according to the information posted on the site.

Since its launch on Monday, the fundraiser has collected more than $19,000.

TUGG, founded in 2009, was started by Jeff Fagnan, a partner at Atlas Venture, and Hemant Taneja of the venture capital firm General Catalyst, the Boston Business Journal reported. The nonprofit group focuses on connecting entrepreneurs and members of the tech community with young people.

Other tech companies are launching their own efforts to help. YouTube has compiled videos related to the explosions on a dedicated page, including videos from news reports, official sources such as the White House, and first-hand accounts of the attacks to give people the latest information.

And — as it has with past emergency events — Google made its people finder tool available for users to search for people who may have been affected by the blasts and to submit information on people that users have spoken with following the explosions.

Google’s Person Finder is currently tracking about 5200 people, according to a figure on its home page.

The Red Cross has a similar tool, Safe and Well, where people can submit information on their own status. The Safe and Well database is available in English and Spanish.

Related stories:

Boston Marathon bomb blasts kill at least three, leave scores injured

Wonkblog: ‘If you are losing faith in human nature, go out and watch a marathon’

Gold, markets down after slowdown in China, Boston marathon attack

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Hayley Tsukayama covers consumer technology for The Washington Post.
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