Gmail redesigned, app coming to the iPhone?

November 1, 2011

On the heels of its Google Reader redesign, Google is finally turning on the changes it teased back in June. According to a post on the company's Gmail blog, Gmail users will see the option to switch to the new format in the next few days.

The company has redesigned the way it handles conversations, making it easier to read through long chains in a way that’s reminiscent of Sparrow. It’s also given users the option to change the density of the display, so you can see everything you want whether you’re checking your on a tablet, computer or smartphone.

The new format also has revamped navigation, which lets you resize the chat and label panels, and better search features. Search will now bring up a menu with “From,” “To,” “Subject” and other fields, and users will also be able to create a filter from the search menu.

The company may have one more trick up its sleeve, however.

Getting Gmail on the iPhone has, up to now, been a bit of a pain. Users have had to input their Gmail data into the phone’s Mail app, which lacks several of the features that are included in Google’s Gmail app for Android.

Now, tech writer MG Siegler is reporting that Gmail app for the iPhone is just about to drop, pending approval from Apple’s App store. Citing multiple unnamed sources, Siegler said that the new app will have push notifications and will likely include priority inbox and one-click message flagging.

He also said that the app may have Google+ integration.

It would be great to see the iPhone get access to Gmail’s organization features, such as being able to see your labels, being able to sign into multiple accounts at once and having better search features such as the ability to search by sender or recipient.

What would you want out of a native Gmail app for the iPhone?

Related stories:

Google Reader, redesigned with Google+ sharing

Occupy Google Reader: Changes to the RSS feed irk the ‘sharebros

Google says Gmail getting a makeover

Hayley Tsukayama covers consumer technology for The Washington Post.
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