Marissa Mayer’s plan for Yahoo

Yahoo chief executive Marissa Mayer spoke Tuesday with employees to discuss her vision for the company.

While Mayer had been expected to release specific details about products and strategies, reports say that she stuck to broader plans that outlined her general vision for the company.

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Brian Wieser, an analyst at Pivotal Research Group, talks about Yahoo’s hiring of Ken Goldman as chief financial officer and the company's growth strategy.

Brian Wieser, an analyst at Pivotal Research Group, talks about Yahoo’s hiring of Ken Goldman as chief financial officer and the company's growth strategy.

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Unnamed Yahoo employees told All Things Digital’s Kara Swisher that the chief focus is on personalization and making mobile Yahoo’s main platform.

Mayer said she wants to focus on the personalization that Yahoo has built with its e-mail service and advertising, as well as the company’s original content, the report said.

She also said that Yahoo would be open to more partnerships and will focus on thinking “at scale.”

Mayer indicated that Yahoo will improve its talent roster by focusing on its culture, company goals, compensation and calibration — which she called the Four C’s, Swisher reported.

Part of Mayer’s strategy also includes replacing chief financial officer Tim Morse, who also served as interim CEO for several months last year. Morse, according to Business Insider, was reportedly wary of working with yet another CEO.

Yahoo has had three CEOs (and two interim CEOs) in a little over a year, since the company fired Carol Bartz in September 2011. Morse provided some stability for the company, as revenues continued to flag.

His replacement, Ken Goldman, comes to Yahoo from the computer-network security firm Fortinet. Bloomberg reports that he has a history of cutting costs and improving oversight at the companies where he’s worked.

Yahoo started moving in several new directions under its many different leaders in the past year. Some executives chose to focus — at various points — on advertising, content and mobile products as the company’s main thrust.

Mayer’s basic plan seems to indicate that the company is looking to integrate its services with other company’s products in order to reach as many people as possible on the screens they use the most.

At least one company has already said that it would love to partner with Yahoo: Mayer’s former stomping ground, Google.

In Tokyo Tuesday, Google chairman Eric Schmidt said that he’d love to work with Yahoo on search, according to Forbes. A similar proposal was rejected by antitrust regulators in 2008, when Yahoo’s search marketshare was much higher. Schmidt reportedly said that there were no plans in motion, but that Google would be interested in taking over from Yahoo’s current partner — Microsoft.

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