Report: SFPD investigating its role in iPhone case

After disclosing that its officers accompanied Apple on a search for a lost iPhone prototype, the San Francisco Police Department told CNET that it’s launching an investigation into the matter. Officers from the SFPD went with Apple after the company tracked a lost prototype of the iPhone to a home in San Francisco’s Bernal Heights neighborhood. According to a Saturday press release from the department, officers did not enter the home to search for the device, though Apple employees did.

Apple declined to file a report about the search, which is why there had not been a previous record of the event, the department said.

The search did not turn up the device. According to CNET, the man whose home was searched, Jose Calderon, said he is “talking to attorneys” but did not say what he was talking with them about.

The SFPD did not immediately return a request to confirm the CNET report.

In other iPhone 5 news, a picture posted to Flickr by an Apple software engineer and reposted by PocketNow may have been taken with an iPhone that has an 8 MP camera. The next iPhone is rumored to be packing an 8MP camera sensor, which means the photo has sent Apple fans into a tizzy.

This is my next pointed out in its report on the photo that the coordinates on the embedded data match up with Apple’s Cupertino, Calif., headquarters, though it’s worth noting that it’s fairly easy to fake photo data. A fun, if unbelievable tidbit: One of TIMN’s dedicated readers actually uncurved the reflection in the plate to reveal something that looks like — but could not be — the reflection of someone taking a picture of the plate with a phone.

Clearly, Apple just needs to release this thing already to put us all out of our speculative misery.

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Lost iPhone: SFPD escorted Apple to search man’s home

Report: Apple employee loses iPhone 5

Hayley Tsukayama covers consumer technology for The Washington Post.

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