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Steve Jobs bio: His thoughts on Android, Obama and modern medicine

Tidbits are leaking out from the highly anticipated Steve Jobs biography from author Walter Isaacson, painting a more complex picture of the late Apple co-founder. The book comes out on Monday.

The Associated Press reported that Jobs, an eternal competitor, was reportedly furious after Google introduced its Android operating system, calling it a stolen product. “I will spend my last dying breath if I need to, and I will spend every penny of Apple’s $40 billion in the bank, to right this wrong,” he reportedly said. “I’m going to destroy Android. I’m willing to go thermonuclear war on this.”

While Apple and Google had enjoyed a close partnership before the Android launch, Jobs reportedly told Google chairman Eric Schmidt that he had no interest in settling Apple’s lawsuit over the system. Android is now the world’s dominant smartphone platform.

Excerpts of the book obtained by the Huffington Post run over Jobs’ relationship with the current administration. According to the report, Jobs told Obama that he was “headed for a one-term presidency” and criticized the president for not being business friendly. Still, Jobs reportedly offered to help Obama with his advertising but knocked heads with senior aide David Axelrod.

Jobs also reportedly told Obama that the country needed to break the country’s teachers unions in order to enact reform. He proposed that school be open until 6 p.m. and be open 11 months out of the year.

In a short preview of an interview with the book’s author posted by CBS, Isaacson said that Jobs regretted his decision to delay surgery that could have prevented his pancreatic cancer from spreading. Jobs had a rare form of pancreatic cancer that could be treated with surgery.

When Isaacson asked Jobs why he chose to treat his cancer with alternative medicine before consenting to surgery, Jobs told him that he “didn't want my body to be opened...I didn't want to be violated in that way.” It’s not clear if delaying the surgery truly would have made a difference in the end, the Associated Press reported, but doctors did say that Jobs waited a “significant period” of time before accepting the recommended treatment.

Related stories:

Apple employees, fans remember Steve Jobs

Jobs told author, ‘I wanted my kids to know me’

Steve Jobs’s funeral a private affair

Hayley Tsukayama covers consumer technology for The Washington Post.



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