Xbox One: Microsoft updates policies on used games, Internet connection


The Xbox One is shown with the Kinect bar (L) during a press event unveiling Microsoft's new Xbox in Redmond, Washington May 21, 2013. REUTERS/Nick Adams (UNITED STATES - Tags: SCIENCE TECHNOLOGY ENTERTAINMENT) (NICK ADAMS/REUTERS)
June 19, 2013

After facing backlash from consumers over policies for its new Xbox One console, Microsoft has updated them for the upcoming device, saying that users will be able to “share, lend and resell” their games in the same way they do today.

In a company blog post, Don Mattrick, president of Interactive Entertainment Business at Microsoft, said that the changes have been made in response to consumer feedback to policies that would have limited video-game players’ ability to lend games to friends and sell older titles on the second-hand market.

The policies tarnished Microsoft’s reputation coming out of the game industry’s Electronic Entertainment Expo earlier this month and gave competitor Sony a crucial opportunity to pick up the goodwill of gamers headed into the holiday season.

Now, the company has said, users will be able to play any disc-based game without having to connect to the Internet once every 24 hours — a requirement that had concerned players in rural areas as well as members of the U.S. armed forces who often play games from remote locations, as the Navy Times reported.

Mattrick also said that Microsoft would change its policies on sharing games, saying that there will be no limitations on how users can share disc-based titles. Previously, the company had said that it would require all disc-based games to be downloaded to the console’s hard drive and that publishers might be able to charge those looking to resell their titles.

In the post, Mattrick said he and his team have heard directly from several people in the gaming community, and he thanked them for “assistance in helping us to reshape the future of the Xbox One.”

“You told us how much you loved the flexibility you have today with games delivered on disc,” Mattrick wrote. “The ability to lend, share, and resell these games at your discretion is of incredible importance to you. Also important to you is the freedom to play offline, for any length of time, anywhere in the world.”

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E3 2013: New titles make a big splash after years of sequels

Sony wins gamers’ goodwill in the console race

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Hayley Tsukayama covers consumer technology for The Washington Post.
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