Nuts & Bolts: 2012 Ferrari FF coupe


2014 Ferrari FF (Ferrari )
November 16, 2013

Bottom line: The FF coupe is the fastest, most luxurious, most expensive hatchback I have driven. It is a toy for the rich.

Ride, acceleration and handling: For best long-drive comfort, choose the “Comfort” setting for the suspension. For best enjoyment of Walter Mitty racetrack fantasies, choose “Sport.”

Body style/layout: The FF replaces the Ferrari 612 Scaglietti, which also was a four-seater. The difference is that the FF has four real seats. The back seats in the 612 Scaglietti were pretend seats, not meant for human occupation. The FF coupe is a front-engine, all-wheel-drive, super-high-performance luxury automobile with aluminum space-frame construction.

Engine/transmission: The car comes with a 6.3-liter, 48-valve, double-overhead-cam gasoline V-12 engine. The engine is linked to a seven-speed automatic transmission that can be operated manually via paddle shifters mounted left and right beneath the steering wheel. Premium-grade gasoline is required.

Mileage: Ha! You get 11 miles per gallon in the city and 17 on the highway under perfect driving conditions — mild weather, superbly maintained roads, relatively free-flowing traffic. Under less-than-perfect driving conditions — with at least two passengers and an estimated 150 pounds of cargo — you get substantially less.

Safety: Standard equipment includes ventilated front and rear disc brakes, four-wheel anti-lock brake protection, electronic brake-force distribution, front parking sensors and front and rear parking cameras, stability and traction control, xenon high-intensity discharge headlamps, side and head air bags, and a fire extinguisher.

Pricing: The Ferrari FF carries a base price of $295,000, same as the listed dealer’s invoice price. The price as tested was $345,284, including $42,834 in options (audiovisual theater for rear passengers, onboard navigation, premium leather interior covering, premium sound and other items), a $3,750 factory-to-dealer destination charge, and a $3,700 federal gas-guzzler tax. On this one, the dealer’s profit margin is whatever the dealer wants it to be.

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