(Sarah L. Voisin / The Washington Post)

Recent Reviews

‘The Love Song of Miss Queenie Hennessy,’ by Rachel Joyce

The companion to “The Unlikely Pilgrimage of Harold Fry” is a moving tale of love, regret and redemption.

Yasar Kemal, Turkish novelist and voice against political injustice, dies

Mr. Kemal, 91, wrote books that uncovered universal traits, what he called the “mystery of the human.”

Donald Hall on meeting Dylan Thomas and a chipmunk

In the winter issue of the American Scholar, the former US Poet Laureate reflects on his long, eventful life.

Book World: James Grady’s ‘Last Days of the Condor’

Four decades later, the iconic CIA agent is again running for his life in this Washington thriller.

The long, pitted road toward large-scale production of electric cars

Two authors, Steve LeVine and Levi Tillemann, explore the obstacles to the big ambitions for electric cars.

A higher form of killing

How six weeks during World War I led to weapons of mass destruction as we know them.

The feminist who felt too much

“Eleanor Marx,” by Rachel Holmes, is a life of Karl Marx’s daughter, an important early feminist.

A voyage into racial controversy

James Fairhead tells how a South Seas cannibal moved to New York and became famous.

The path from hard work to genius

Kevin Ashton debunks the myths of genius: even Einstein and Mozart had to sweat the process to succeed.

Ni­ger­ian writer Helon Habila wins a Windham Campbell Prize

A creative writing professor at George Mason University, Habila says he was ‘in a daze’ when he heard the news.

Life on the cutting edge: Kim Gordon’s ‘Girl in a Band’

In her new memoir, the Sonic Youth rocker says she sometimes felt “frumpy.”

‘The Life-Changing Magic of Tidying-Up’ vs. Ben Franklin

Marie Kondo says you can declutter your life. Franklin discovered that was a vexation.

Finding solace in the skies: Helen Macdonald’s memoir ‘H is for Hawk’

After her father’s death, the author copes with her grief in a most unusual way — by training a raptor.

Why were we mesmerized by llama chase? The author of ‘Llama Llama Red Pajama’ knows why.

The author of “Llama Llama Red Pajama” was reading to kids just a few miles away.

Will your city get Shakespeare’s First Folio?

The Folger Library has chosen which cities across the U.S. will get to host a free, four-week display of one of the world’s most valuable books.

‘Insecure’ at last: With a television pilot and memoir, ‘Awkward Black Girl’ Issa Rae finds new success

Her book’s a bestseller and HBO has ordered a pilot of her show, “Insecure,” but Issa Rae already has her eye on her next target.

‘Like a Bomb Going Off,’ by Janice Ross

Leonid Yakobson and ballet as an act of resistance in Soviet Russia.

Book World: A burst pipe, soggy tomes and a lesson in the economy of Nature

Boxing up the treasured books collected over a lifetime brought a transcendent reunion with old friends.

A newly discovered trove of unknown fairy tales: ‘The Turnip Princess’

Available for the first time in English, these stories paint a harsher world than the Brothers Grimm.

Review: Kazuo Ishiguro’s ‘The Buried Giant’ defies easy categorization

Set in the misty bogs of medieval England, where dragons and wizards lurk, the novel has the ring of legend.

Best science fiction and fantasy for February

New books by Claire North, Neil Gaiman and Jeremy Robert Johnson.

‘Blood-Drenched Beard,’ by Daniel Galera

Winner of the 2013 São Paulo prize is the first of Galera’s novels to be translated into English.

How a long-lost manuscript changed one writer’s life

Memoirist Mimi Baird’s father disappeared when she was a child. Decades later, she’s published a memoir about rediscovering him through the shocking diary he left behind.

Book review: ‘The Secret Wisdom of the Earth’

Christopher Scotton’s novel tells the tale of a 14-year-old boy’s coming of age following a family tragedy.

Review: ‘Hush Hush’ by Laura Lippman

Detective Tess Monaghan juggles motherhood with mystery-solving.

Why we give in to the giants of industry

Steve Fraser surveys American resistance to wealth and power and sees timidity now in our midst.

Making greed into a game

Mary Pilon’s ‘The Monopolists’ untangles the knotty history of a popular board game.

Post 9/11 CIA chase to topple Taliban and track down a scattering al-Qaeda

Robert L. Grenier, former CIA station chief, details the absurd, ad hoc world of the U.S. in Afghanistan after 9/11

A founder and his allies

David O. Stewart chronicles the partnerships that helped James Madison shape the republic.

A chronicler of the civil rights movement

‘Eye on the Struggle,’ by James McGrath Morris, is the biography of a pioneering black journalist.

A Prince Charles biography stirring angst among British royalty

Catherine Mayer reveals Prince Charles’s plans to redefine the role of the British sovereign.

Criticized for her weight, opera star Deborah Voigt speaks up

In her memoir “Call Me Debbie,” the renowned soprano explains how her weight has affected her work.

What more is there to know about Stevie Nicks?

A new biography, by Zoe Howe, offers (some) fresh material about the Fleetwood Mac star

Laura van den Berg on ‘Find Me’

Van den Berg talks about her new dystopian novel, alligator hotlines and ghosts in Key West.

‘Tell,’ by Frances Itani

Canadian writer pens a follow-up to her celebrated novel “Deafening.”

What you think about dangerous inner-city neighborhoods is wrong

A review of “Ghettoside” by Jill Leovy.

How to go after big, bold goals

XPrize founder Peter Diamandis talks about how to see big problems as big opportunities.

Book review: Kelly Link’s fantastic, fantastical ‘Get in Trouble’

The story collection highlights the allure of the peculiar. Who needs tediously believable situations?

Do we really want a new Dr. Seuss book?

This summer Random House will release “What Pet Should I Get?” -- a never-before published book by the master children’s writer.

Philip Levine, U.S. poet laureate who wrote of working life, dies at 87

Mr. Levine, who worked in the factories of Detroit, wrote poetry about the dignity of ordinary people.

Washington Post Bestsellers March 1, 2015

The books Washington has been reading.

The Style Blog

Ron Charles

Donald Hall on meeting Dylan Thomas and a chipmunk

In the winter issue of the American Scholar, the former US Poet Laureate reflects on his long, eventful life.

Ron Charles

Ron Charles

Ni­ger­ian writer Helon Habila wins a Windham Campbell Prize

A creative writing professor at George Mason University, Habila says he was ‘in a daze’ when he heard the news.

The Style Blog

Ron Charles

‘The Life-Changing Magic of Tidying-Up’ vs. Ben Franklin

Marie Kondo says you can declutter your life. Franklin discovered that was a vexation.

Michael Dirda

Michael Dirda

A newly discovered trove of unknown fairy tales: ‘The Turnip Princess’

Available for the first time in English, these stories paint a harsher world than the Brothers Grimm.

Michael Dirda

Michael Dirda

Book review: Kelly Link’s fantastic, fantastical ‘Get in Trouble’

The story collection highlights the allure of the peculiar. Who needs tediously believable situations?

Michael Dirda

Michael Dirda

The 19th-century best-selling horror novel that isn’t ‘Dracula’

Richard Marsh’s “The Beetle” offers more than the shivers. It helps map the development of urban Gothic.

Book Party

Carlos Lozada

So, how much is there left to write about Abraham Lincoln?

150 years and 15,000 books later, authors still scrounge for new angles.

Carlos Lozada

Carlos Lozada

Self-indulgence, now available in paperback

BOOK REVIEW | Inside those parts of a book that you probably never read

Book Party

Carlos Lozada

The most self-serving words in publishing; ‘New Afterword by the Author’

Inside those parts of a book that you probably never read

Literary Calendar

Going Out Guide: Upcoming events

Going Out Guide: Upcoming events

Get the latest on readings, signings and author appearances in the D.C. area.