Dancing Fiends

September 5, 2012

Breakdancers get up at Eighteenth Street Lounge.

Last week, new dance club Tropicalia quietly opened beneath Subway at the corner of 14th and U streets, and the owners — folks who’ve had their hands in D.C.’s dance scene for years — are quickly creating a buzz. Featuring DJs blasting sounds from Africa, Latin America and the Middle East through a massive new sound system, the club is sure to attract dance fanatics from all quadrants. But the District has no dearth of dance floors for those serious about breaking it down.

U Street Music Hall’s Red Fridays pay tribute to Red, a now-defunct Dupont Circle club popular among B-boys, hip-hoppers and house music aficionados until its 2005 closure. U Hall re-creates that vibe pretty well, says Sylvana Christopher, a local professional dancer. “You can find a dancer from the Washington Ballet not far from a great all-styles club diehard.” (1115A U St. NW)

Eighteenth Street Lounge, known as “church” to the devoted, features local DJ Sam “the Man” Burns spinning deep soul-house on Sundays to a crowd that’s as mixed as it gets: The common denominator is dancing as freely as possible. “It’s good party, a meat market, a spiritual retreat,” Christopher says. (1212 18th St. NW)

Marvin’s Mondays offer old-school hip-hop. On Thursdays, Patty Boom Boom’s Live 95 has reggaeton, ska and dancehall music. The latter is crowded and super-sweaty — so save it for a week when you’re craving hard-core boogying. (2007 14th St. NW)

Tropicalia, 2001 14th St. NW; 202-629-4535.
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