Trouser press

khaki
Trouser Press
Khakis trace their lineage to 19th-century British soldiers, who wore the tan-colored pants into battle. Bills Khakis, a made-in-America producer of the iconic dungarees (plus shirts and sweaters to go with them), brings a  trunk show of men’s styles to Georgetown’s Sherman Pickey (1647 Wisconsin Ave. NW; 202-333-4212) Saturday through Thursday. Sharp buys include super-soft cords (shown, $165) and wool sweaters (shown, $225).

Cairo Practice
In Egypt, exotic spices are as much a part of the culture as hulking pyramids. That’s where dukkah, a blend of herbs and nuts, originated. The flavorful condiment, now on the shelves at Trader Joe’s ($4), is made by pounding ingredients into a yummy sort of dust. It tastes great on broiled fish and roasted chicken or, when mixed with olive oil, as a dip for bread or crackers.

Material Girls
Sensai’s new Skin Focus Corrector stick ($38, sensai-cosmetics.com) contains the same properties found in koishimaru silk, a precious material from Japan said to soften skin. Translation: It conceals deep wrinkles and imperfections while making your dermis feel like buttah.

Making a Stand
Moroccan rugs, lanterns and slippers seem to be on every Pinterest board and home-decor blog around. Jonathan Adler puts a cheeky spin on the country’s Silk Road style with new leather-covered side tables ($395 each, Jonathan Adler, 1267 Wisconsin Ave NW; 202-965-1416). They’re the ideal size for — what else? — a glass of minty tea.

It’s a Wonder
In its continued effort to make sure every DMV resident buys its cute tchotchkes (such as a gold piggy bank, $58, shown) and monogrammed everything, lifestyle brand C. Wonder opens its second location in Virginia on Friday at The Fashion Centre at Pentagon City (1100 S. Hayes St., Arlington; 703-413-7046). A cheery interior drenched in happy hues sets off striped clothing for men and women, country-clubby decor and preppy shoes, including camo-print calf-hair slippers ($138) for her.

Holley Simmons is the dining editor of The Washington Post Express. When she’s not reporting on local restaurants and tastemakers, you can find her sewing a dress from a 1950s pattern or planting a windowsill herb garden. Contact her at holley.simmons@wpost.com.
Comments
Show Comments
Most Read
Next Story
Holley Simmons · October 11, 2013