Looks like we still don’t want to move to Chernobyl

Sergei Supinsky / AFP/Getty Images Sergei Supinsky / AFP/Getty Images

While Friday should warrant nothing but fun, sometimes it’s good to get a little academic. But maybe in a city so chock full of millennials, who polls say are pretty smart, maybe a little learning will actually beget a bit of joy. If only the subject matter weren’t so grim…

Thanks to the Internet, we all know now why people can move to Hiroshima and Nagasaki, but not Chernobyl. Read about that below, as well as where the photo of the pleasantly smiling brunette on healthcare.gov came from, what might be the perfect solution to the Washington football team’s controversial nickname, why Benedict Cumberbatch is so popular online but over half the country still has no idea who he is and, last but not least, we discover some details about a “Murder, She Wrote” reprisal. It’s on, Blog Log!

“This difference is attributable to three factors: (1) the Chernobyl reactor had a lot more nuclear fuel; (2) that was much more efficiently used in reactions; and (3) the whole mess exploded at ground level.” — Melissa at todayifoundout.com attempts to answer why people can live in Hiroshima and Nagasaki, Japan, where the United States dropped two nuclear bombs in 1945, but not in Chernobyl, Ukraine, where the worst nuclear power plant accident in history occurred in 1986. Interestingly, though, people’s pets might fair OK in that section of the former Soviet Union. Moose, beavers, deer and more furry mammals have moved back to the region and still aren’t mutants.

“much ado about less than nothing.” — commenter Stump Junkman at buzzfeed.com reacts to Buzzfeed’s failed attempt to discover the name of the woman whose smiling face greets those who visit healthcare.gov. The Affordable Care Act’s website has been riddled with problems since its Oct. 1 launch, which has spawned a new meme: People have been Photoshopping screen grabs of the site’s home page — i.e. making the woman’s face look panicked — and the funniest iterations have gone viral.

“Here is a rebrand from the Redundancy Department of Redundancy.” — Marie Formica at famousdc.com suggests that the Washington Redskins be rebranded as the Washington Washingtons. Formica notes that George Washington’s profile is not so different from the profile of the current logo and that Washington wore similarly tight pants, just like the players.

“The upside of the Internet’s bewildering ability to turn small oddities into viral sensations is that fan favorites — like Gosling, Cumberbatch, and golden boy Channing Tatum — have more opportunities for exposure.” — Amanda Dobbins at vulture.com says there’s a difference between “Internet fame” and national recognition. She finds that the two don’t match up, in that sometimes those whose fans tweet the most about them don’t achieve as much recognition offline as one would think. When Ryan Gosling’s meme was asked about all this, he said, “Hey girl, I’ll always recognize you at the national level.”

“Angela had better appear — even briefly — on this reboot!” — commenter Sparky at deadline.com has just one demand after news broke that NBC is going to reprise “Murder, She Wrote” with Oscar-winning actress Octavia Spencer as the lead. Angela Lansbury played the role of Jessica Fletcher, the mystery writer and amateur detective, in the original series, which aired from 1984 to 1996 on CBS. Will you watch?

See anything on the Web you think would fit into Blog Log? Let us know by tweeting your links to @WaPoExpress. Audience participation isn’t required, but it’s certainly encouraged.

Marissa Payne writes for The Early Lead, a fast-breaking sports blog, where she focuses on what she calls the “cultural anthropological” side of sports, aka “mostly the fun stuff.” She is also an avid WWE fan.
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