Adrian Silversmith of Sprelly plans to open a peanut butter restaurant


Photos by Stephanie Breijo

In June 2013, Adrian Silversmith had a thought: What if there were a restaurant devoted entirely to peanut butter? Not long after, the Fredericksburg, Va., resident launched Sprelly — his line of flavored nut butters — and began hawking them at local farmers markets. Today, he sells up to 700 tubs a week (find him at sprelly.com) and plans to open a PB&J-centric restaurant and creperie in downtown Fredericksburg, also named Sprelly, in October. Here are ways to spread five of his most popular flavors till then.

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Salted butterscotch
In an ice cream sundae
“A lot of people tell me this is better than Nutella,” Silversmith says of this simple-yet-delicious peanut butter made from only three ingredients: peanuts, butterscotch morsels and sea salt. We think it tastes like the inside of a Butterfinger bar and couldn’t resist putting gobs of it on top of vanilla ice cream along with whipped cream and chocolate syrup.

banana

White chocolate almond
On a banana
For this sweet smear, Silversmith simply mixes almonds grown in California with white chocolate morsels. The result is a dense, crunchy mixture whose richness pairs well with bananas. Silversmith plans to use this spread in a crepe with strawberries and raspberries at his Sprelly’s restaurant. “And who knows, maybe I’ll throw in a little bacon,” he says.

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Cinnamon
With sliced apples
This childhood classic gets elevated once you add cinnamon chips to the equation. “I use chips instead of the spice because it melts into the peanut butter better,” Silversmith says of the baking chips he adds to his nut blender. The steel wheel makes quick work of the peanuts, and the friction heats up the mixture and makes for smooth blending.

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Almond/cashew/coconut  
In a classic PB&J
The coconut oil not only flavors this versatile butter, but it also makes it more spreadable. “Cashews and almonds are dry nuts, so I add organic coconut oil to make it less chunky,” Silversmith says. We like it on old-school white bread with raspberry jelly, and Silversmith has plans to serve it grilled with coconut/pineapple jam, provolone cheese and smoked ham.

Sweet Thai chili
Shrimp in peanut sauce
The initial sweetness of this peanut butter distracts you while a wave of spice from the chilies sneaks up on your tongue. It works well with foods that also have a hint of sweetness, such as shrimp and starchy pastas. We combined the two for a simple Thai-inspired noodle dish.

Recipe (serves three)

  •  Cook a pack of udon noodles according to directions on bag.
  •  Saute 12 shrimp in olive oil.
  •  Mix 2 tablespoons of sweet Thai chili peanut butter, 2 tablespoons of rice wine vinegar and 1 tablespoon of sesame oil.
  •  Toss noodles in sauce. Top with shrimp, cilantro, scallions and crushed peanuts.

 

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Holley Simmons is the dining editor of Express. When she’s not reporting on local restaurants and tastemakers, you can find her sewing a dress from a 1950s pattern or planting a windowsill herb garden. Contact her at holley.simmons@washpost.com.

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Jason Butt · August 13, 2014