Editors' pick

Bangkok Golden Thai Restaurant

Thai
$$$$ ($14 and under)
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Editorial Review

2013 Fall Dining Guide

2013 Fall Dining Guide
By Tom Sietsema
October 10, 2013

Visitors to this cramped but cheery storefront are handed two menus. One, no surprise, lists Thai dishes. The second -- no longer a big secret -- offers Laotian fare. For years now, I've filled up on the latter, partly because there aren't many purveyors of food from Laos, but also because I can never get too much of the country's distinctive heat.

The chicken wings burst with flavor from their marinade of lemongrass, soy sauce and ginger as well as their time on the grill. Shredded bamboo shoots tossed with ginger, garlic, mint and shallots, then dusted with toasted ground rice, is a salad like few others.

Owner Seng Luangrath, one of the restaurant's two Laotian cooks, also keeps us in our seats with minced duck (larb ped) splashed with a dressing of chilies and lime, and a bowl of rice noodles, ground pork, coconut milk, chili paste and bean sprouts (mee kathi). The best way to beat the heat is to eat the fiery stuff with sticky rice, pinches of which can be rolled into little balls to mop up the sauces.

On my last trip here, I added to my usual Laotian feast shrimp cakes, lightly springy and laced with curry, and tapioca balls, a special of translucent dumplings stuffed with sweet ground pork, ground peanuts and shallots: two Thai treasures that prompt me to cross borders more often.

2011 Fall Dining Guide

2011 Fall Dining Guide
By Tom Sietsema
Sunday, October 16, 2011

The secret to ordering at the mango-hued Bangkok Golden Thai is to remember that both of its chefs are from Laos. That's your cue to zero in on a style of cooking known for its fiery flavors, restrained sweetness and use of short-grain sticky rice. Among the numbers to keep in mind on the menu are 5, a loose and fragrant pork sausage presented with roasted peanuts and matchsticks of ginger, and 18, ground duck brightened with mint and citrus. Then again, the shrimp cakes (No. 1, appropriately) and the julienned green mango salad (No. 10) are equally choice destinations. The latter is searing with red Thai chilies, but it's not such a torch-bearer that you can't taste the shrimp, tomato and garlic in the mix. Grilling is preferred to frying in the Laotian kitchen; a skewer of juicy charred pork, pulsing with lemon grass and ginger, endorses that approach. I appreciate that no two sauces seem the same here, and if I forget to explore the Thai lunch buffet ($8.95 weekdays, $12.95 weekends), it's because all things Laotian keep me from straying.