Can’t sleep? Turn off your electronics.

(Sam Diephuis / Getty Images)

The blue light from smartphones and laptops can keep people awake and disrupt sleep patterns, especially for teenagers.

    Latest headlines

    Boil-water advisory for 100,000 in Prince George’s County

    Areas involved include Hyattsville, Bladensburg, Mount Rainier, Cheverly and Seat Pleasant.

    GOP Senate hopefuls favor over-the-counter birth control

    GOP Senate hopefuls favor over-the-counter birth control

    The endorsements are seen as a salvo in the political battle over women’s votes.

    Global officials say window for controlling Ebola is closing

    Global officials say window for controlling Ebola is closing

    WHO and CDC officials say countries need to act now as fourth American in Liberia tests positive for virus.

    Another U.S. doctor infected by Ebola in Liberia

    Another U.S. doctor infected by Ebola in Liberia

    He is the fourth American to be diagnosed with Ebola in West Africa.

    Behavior change requires more than just good intentions

    Behavior change requires more than just good intentions

    Predictions about our own future behavior are often wildly optimistic because we don’t consider how difficult it is to translate intent into action.

    Low carb diets are better for hearts than low fat ones

    Low carb diets are better for hearts than low fat ones

    Study finds that people who reduced carbs saw bigger drop in risk factors for heart disease.

    Here’s an idea: Inspire patients instead of scaring them

    Here’s an idea: Inspire patients instead of scaring them

    A medical student thinks mentoring can people help manage chronic disease better than threats.

    Food labels aren’t easy to understand

    Food labels aren’t easy to understand

    How do you decide between a pasta sauce with “reduced sodium” and another with “low sodium”?

    At what age should a child see a doctor alone?

    At what age should a child see a doctor alone?

    When puberty begins, parents should prepare their kids for some private conversations.

    ‘Dr. Mom’ hangs up her stethoscope

    You need to watch over your child’s health care, and here’s how to do it. Oh, and step aside when it’s time.

    Have you heard the one about calculus?

    Have you heard the one about calculus?

    Seriously, a math humor columnist writes a novel about a zombie attack on a liberal arts college.

    Why do teens do such crazy stuff? It’s all in their brains.

    Experts say the human brain changes dramatically until the mid-20s, and much of that change affects behavior.

    Are lotions, makeup and creams dangerous to your health?

    Are lotions, makeup and creams dangerous to your health?

    Hard evidence is scant. If you are worried, try to avoid products with fragrance added.

    Beyond the Ice Bucket Challenge: Ex-NFLer confronts ALS

    Beyond the Ice Bucket Challenge: Ex-NFLer confronts ALS

    Now immobilized, Steve Gleason uses special technology to type, speak, pay bills and e-mail.

    Discovery of rock art shows Neanderthals were artistic

    Discovery of rock art shows Neanderthals were artistic

    Engravings inside a Gibraltar cave are the first known examples of creative leanings, scientists say.

    Eating too many instant noodles may be bad for your heart

    Eating too many instant noodles may be bad for your heart

    A study finds metabolic changes linked to heart disease and stroke for twice-weekly consumption of ramen.

    Steer clear of psychiatrist’s Facebook page

    Personal details are for Facebook “friends.” Don’t look, if you’re not interested.

    ‘Feather-loss disorder’ puts young penguins at risk

    ‘Feather-loss disorder’ puts young penguins at risk

    A rare disease first seen in a captive penguin chick in 2006 is showing up in the wild.

    Can’t sleep? Turn off your electronics.

    Can’t sleep? Turn off your electronics.

    The blue light from smartphones and laptops can keep people awake and disrupt sleep patterns, especially for teenagers.

    Photos

    Fighting to contain Ebola

    Fighting to contain Ebola

    Governments move to stop the latest outbreak from spreading further as the death toll from the virus tops 1,300.

    ‘Dead zone’ returns in force to troubled Chesapeake Bay

    ‘Dead zone’ returns in force to troubled Chesapeake Bay

    Scientists are observing large oxygen-depleted zones in East Coast waterways as pollution curbs falter.

    Skywatch: Chance to see planetary pals Mars and Saturn

    Skywatch: Chance to see planetary pals Mars and Saturn

    A roundup of what to see at night in September and area events of interest to stargazers.

    Novel heart-failure drug shows big promise, study says

    Novel heart-failure drug shows big promise, study says

    Experimental medicine from Novartis is found to lower the odds of death or hospitalization by about 20 percent.

    Drug cures monkeys of Ebola; disease spreads to Senegal

    Drug cures monkeys of Ebola; disease spreads to Senegal

    Research using ZMapp is “a huge step forward,” expert says, but supply of the drug is exhausted.

    Graphic

    Ebola’s accelerating spread across Africa

    Ebola’s accelerating spread across Africa

    The World Health Organization said Thursday that the outbreak that has ravaged West Africa could infect 20,000 people before it is over.With over 1,500 deaths recorded so far, the virus is certain to claim more lives. At least 3,000 people are believed to have been infected in the current outbreak, but WHO officials believe that the tally could be much higher.

    Sense of urgency heightens over Ebola crisis

    Sense of urgency heightens over Ebola crisis

    As the virus has repeatedly mutated in recent months, the WHO seeks to stop the outbreak within nine months.

    Mystery: Arctic people thrived 4,000 years, then vanished

    Mystery: Arctic people thrived 4,000 years, then vanished

    What happened to the Dorsets? Paleo-Eskimos hunted in isolation for millennia until driven to extinction.

    Zapping your brain really does improve memory

    Zapping your brain really does improve memory

    Non-invasive brain stimulation causes a slight uptick in memory performance.

    Quarantining an entire Liberian slum will make the Ebola epidemic worse, not better

    Quarantining an entire Liberian slum will make the Ebola epidemic worse, not better

    Food, water and medicine are becoming scarce in West Point, which will make the Ebola epidemic worse, not better.

    Ebola virus could infect 20,000 before outbreak is over, WHO says

    Ebola virus could infect 20,000 before outbreak is over, WHO says

    With 1,552 deaths recorded so far, the virus is certain to claim more lives than all of the previous Ebola outbreaks combined.

    Ebola virus has mutated during course of outbreak

    Ebola virus has mutated during course of outbreak

    Scientists say sequencing of Ebola genome also offers clues to outbreak’s origins.

    Electrical current to brain jolts memory performance

    Results from NIH-funded study hold promise for treating Alzheimers and other memory disorders

    Hotel rooms aren’t yucky — you colonize them with your own personal bacteria within hours

    Hotel rooms aren’t yucky — you colonize them with your own personal bacteria within hours

    Your signature bacteria colonize a space within hours, and are unique enough to pinpoint a killer.

    NIH to start human trials for Ebola vaccine

    NIH to start human trials for Ebola vaccine

    The vaccine does not allow Ebola genes to replicate, so it can’t infect vaccinated people, an official says.

    Tall men have their pick of the dating pool

    Tall men have their pick of the dating pool

    A new study also finds that tall guys do more housework.

    Famous giant panda fakes pregnancy, gets nice things

    Famous giant panda fakes pregnancy, gets nice things

    Chinese officials called off a live-broadcast of Ai Hin giving birth, because she wasn’t actually pregnant. Researchers say “phantom pregnancies” are actually quite common.

    Walking fish raised on land mimic ancient evolutionary transition

    Walking fish raised on land mimic ancient evolutionary transition

    When they grow up on land, these fish get better and better at walking.

    Scientists switch ‘good’ and ‘bad’ memories in mice

    Scientists switch ‘good’ and ‘bad’ memories in mice

    The neurons that recall a bad memory can be switched to give warm and fuzzy feelings.

    The most common chronic disease of childhood, and what you can do about it

    The most common chronic disease of childhood, and what you can do about it

    Dental caries, or cavities, remain stubbornly common among the young. New recommendation: brush teeth as soon as they appear

    Latest from Kaiser Health News