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9 apple varieties to try

By Jane Touzalin,

These nine apple varieties are relatively new to their local growers. All are available now at area farmers markets.

Select apples that feel firm and are unbruised. Store them in the produce drawer of your refrigerator.

Ambrosia (Nob Hill Orchards, Gerrardstown, W.Va.)

Tender and sweet. Best use is fresh or in salads; good with cheese. Acidity is too low to make it the best choice for pies or most baking. Flesh softens quickly, but it should store for up to three months.

Crimson Crisp (Twin Springs Fruit Farm, Orrtanna, Pa.)

Firm, tart to sweet. Primarily eaten fresh, but considered an all-purpose apple. Should be usable for four months.

Fortune (Nob Hill)

Tender and sweet. One of the best for baked apples, or eat it fresh. It stores better than many varieties; use by January.

Miracle Mac (Twin Springs)

Firm, semi-sweet. A juicy, all-purpose McIntosh variety that’s good for baking, applesauce or cider. It’s new to the orchard, so long-term storage ability hasn’t been determined.

New York 674 (Nob Hill)

Starts out firm, varying from tart to sweet, but deteriorates quickly, so use it fast. Put one in a pie with other varieties to add juice and flavor. Good for applesauce.

Pinova (Nob Hill)

Firm, tart to sweet. Tasty but not very acidic; excellent fresh, and okay for pies. Its skin will eventually wrinkle, but the fruit should be usable until February. Also called Sonata.

September Wonder (Spring Valley Farm & Orchard, Slanesville, W.Va.)

Tender-sweet. A variety of Fuji, it’s good for eating out of hand, baking, applesauce. Very juicy. Good for long-term storage.

Spigold (Nob Hill)

Firm-sweet. Mostly eaten fresh, but bakes and cooks well. Storage varies from year to year, but last year this apple was still usable in February.

Suncrisp (Nob Hill)

Firm-tart. On the acidic side. Mostly eaten fresh, but will hold its shape during baking. Good with a strong-tasting cheese. Can be stored for up to three months.

SOURCES: Individual growers; “The Apple Lover’s Cookbook,” by Amy Traverso (Norton, 2011).

RECIPES:

Salmon With Gala Apple and Celery-Horseradish Puree

Butternut Squash, Jonagold Apple and Caramelized Onion Tian

Batter Fried Apple Rings

Apple Black Walnut Pudding Cake

Honey Mustard Broccoli Salad

Chicken and Apples With Lemon Balsamic Sauce

Try these Virginia ciders

Virginia cider, flavored by early America

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