House of Steep in Arlington

(Sarah L. Voisin/ THE WASHINGTON POST ) - The house-blended Clarity tea, earthen and mild, is made with gingko and juniper berries and served by the pot or mug. It arrives with a timer for customized steeping and a leaf-shaped lavender cookie.

(Sarah L. Voisin/ THE WASHINGTON POST ) - The house-blended Clarity tea, earthen and mild, is made with gingko and juniper berries and served by the pot or mug. It arrives with a timer for customized steeping and a leaf-shaped lavender cookie.

Most eateries have a place to sit down while your takeout order is being prepared. It’s exceedingly rare that a foot bath is recommended to help pass the time. But that’s what happens at House of Steep, which opened last September in Arlington.

The narrow space offers something of a triple play: teahouse and cafe in the front, “foot sanctuary” in the back. The concept was developed by 31-year-old Arlingtonian Lyndsey DePalma, who says she was inspired by her great-grandmother. “She soaked her feet every day, lived to a ripe old age, was healthy as a horse and had a happy life,” DePalma says. “So I thought there might be something to the whole foot soaking business.”

VIENNA, VA, JANUARY 9, 2013: Winter salad of shaved cucumber, radish and endive with lemon vinaigrette. Dishware courtesy of Crate & Barrel. (Photo by ASTRID RIECKEN For The Washington Post)

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House of Steep

$ ($14 and under) |
Information: 703-334-2632
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You can choose from more than 40 teas — including nearly a dozen house blends — at one of the six tables, at the two-seat counter or while your feet are relaxing. I enjoyed a steaming mug of the house’s Clarity tea (cup, $4.50; pot, $6). Made with ginkgo and juniper berries, it arrived with the faint whiff of Christmas. However, it was much milder and more earthen than its aroma let on. Accompanied by a timer for personal-preference steeping and a one-bite, leaf-shaped lavender cookie, it was the perfect sip on a cold winter’s day.

The health-conscious menu was devised by self-taught culinarian DePalma and includes a modest selection of sandwiches, salads, soups and snacks. Carryout food is dispatched in sturdy cardboard boxes and bowls. (No food is allowed in the treatment area.) I liked the simple yet well-executed seaweed salad, with its sesame oil and hint of heat ($4.99). The dainty, quartered tea sandwich features smoked sockeye salmon with sliced cucumber and an avocado aioli on soft whole-wheat bread ($6.99).

Each of the five rice bowls on the menu represents a country or region: Thailand, India, Japan, China and the Mediterranean ($8.99 each). The Japanese is pumped up with a sinus-clearing amount of wasabi in the broth, as well as broccoli florets, baby corn, mushroom caps and a dash of dried seaweed on top. A choice of tofu, shrimp or strips of grilled chicken breast finishes the dish, which takes about 15 minutes for the House of Steep to prepare.

After lunch was sorted out, I headed for a Recovery Soak. “You’ll get some lemon and sandalwood scents,” the therapist noted as she mixed 105-degree water and spices in a copper basin. “There might be some thyme in there, too. It’s reminding me of roast chicken right now.”

She was right on — and so was the soak ($22), which left my feet feeling refreshed and invigorated for the rest of the day.

— Nevin Martell

House of Steep 3800 Lee Hwy., Arlington. 703-334-2632. www.houseofsteep.com. Hours: Mondays through Fridays, 7 a.m. to 8 p.m.; Saturdays, 8 a.m. to 8 p.m.; Sundays, 10 a.m. to 5 p.m.

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