“There's just always way too much stuff going on in my head,\

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“There's just always way too much stuff going on in my head," says Michelle Suppers of Manassas. She is one of about 8 million people in the United States between ages 18 and 44 with ADHD.

Matt McClain/For The Washington Post

Son Christopher, 3, in foreground, provides a distraction while Suppers tries to help her older son, Anthony, with his homework. Anthony, 6, has ADHD.

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Son Christopher, 3, in foreground, provides a distraction while Suppers tries to help her older son, Anthony, with his homework. Anthony, 6, has ADHD.

Caitlin Teal Price/For The Washington Post

Suppers aims to keep the living room quiet so she and Christopher can work.

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Suppers aims to keep the living room quiet so she and Christopher can work.

Caitlin Teal Price/For The Washington Post

Suppers holds on to Christopher while Anthony does his homework. The afternoon can be Suppers's most stressful time of day.

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Suppers holds on to Christopher while Anthony does his homework. The afternoon can be Suppers's most stressful time of day.

Caitlin Teal Price/For The Washington Post

Suppers folds laundry in her room. The more she has learned about her son's ADHD, the more she wondered if she has it. An online ADHD screening quiz recommended that she see a trained mental health professional -- immediately.

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Suppers folds laundry in her room. The more she has learned about her son's ADHD, the more she wondered if she has it. An online ADHD screening quiz recommended that she see a trained mental health professional -- immediately.

Caitlin Teal Price/For The Washington Post

Parts of Suppers's house are a jumble, but she makes a big effort to keep the kids organized.

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Parts of Suppers's house are a jumble, but she makes a big effort to keep the kids organized.

Caitlin Teal Price/For The Washington Post

Anthony in his car seat. His ADHD was diagnosed in 2009. Suppers, who remembers her own troubles learning in school, decided to take him to a behavioral specialist when he \

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Anthony in his car seat. His ADHD was diagnosed in 2009. Suppers, who remembers her own troubles learning in school, decided to take him to a behavioral specialist when he "started to say, 'I'm just so stupid. I can't do it.' ... I don't want him to feel different, like I did."

Caitlin Teal Price/For The Washington Post

Kim Rudisill, 46, with her guinea pig Tuxedo. Rudisill, an aerospace engineer, has ADHD. She works with a coach to keep her life organized.

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Kim Rudisill, 46, with her guinea pig Tuxedo. Rudisill, an aerospace engineer, has ADHD. She works with a coach to keep her life organized.

Caitlin Teal Price/For The Washington Post

Rudisill also takes multiple pills each day. When she has forgotten to take her them, “my boss will ask, 'Kim, are you listening? Are you taking your meds?' \

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Rudisill also takes multiple pills each day. When she has forgotten to take her them, “my boss will ask, 'Kim, are you listening? Are you taking your meds?' " she says.

Caitlin Teal Price/For The Washington Post

Rudisill wears a watch with alarms to remind her of tasks such as eating.

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Rudisill wears a watch with alarms to remind her of tasks such as eating.

Caitlin Teal Price/For The Washington Post

Rudisill's notebook contains daily reminders to herself. Women, whose average age at diagnosis is 36 to 38, account for the fastest-growing group taking prescription ADHD medication.

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Rudisill's notebook contains daily reminders to herself. Women, whose average age at diagnosis is 36 to 38, account for the fastest-growing group taking prescription ADHD medication.

Caitlin Teal Price/For The Washington Post

Sandy Maynard was one of the first ADHD coaches in the Washington area. She also has ADHD.

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Sandy Maynard was one of the first ADHD coaches in the Washington area. She also has ADHD.

Caitlin Teal Price/For The Washington Post

Maynard sets timers, posts notes, exercises and logs appointments carefully to keep herself organized. Because her life is so structured, she says, she has not felt the need to take medication.

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Maynard sets timers, posts notes, exercises and logs appointments carefully to keep herself organized. Because her life is so structured, she says, she has not felt the need to take medication.

Caitlin Teal Price/For The Washington Post

Maynard on her daily jog through Rock Creek Park, which helps keep her focused.

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Maynard on her daily jog through Rock Creek Park, which helps keep her focused.

Caitlin Teal Price/For The Washington Post

Maynard maintains a clutter-free apartment/office.

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Maynard maintains a clutter-free apartment/office.

Caitlin Teal Price/For The Washington Post

Here in the overachieving Washington area, Maynard has so many ADHD clients that she works full time, earning six figures.

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Here in the overachieving Washington area, Maynard has so many ADHD clients that she works full time, earning six figures.

Caitlin Teal Price/For The Washington Post