Bernard Waber’s ‘Lyle, Lyle, Crocodile’ books still resonate with children, parents

When children’s author Bernard Waber died earlier this month, the staff at Politics & Prose in the District set up a table displaying his books, including “The House on 88th Street” and “Lyle, Lyle, Crocodile,” to honor his work. The books, some of them 50 years old, flew off the shelves, according to Heidi Powell, the manager of the children and teens section at the store.

Waber’s books featuring Lyle the friendly crocodile resonate with both children and parents, Powell said. And “Ira Sleeps Over,” about a boy’s trepidation before his first sleepover, remains popular with older children, said Powell.

(Associated Press/Associated Press) - Children's author Bernard Waber in New York.

“They are fairly timeless,” Powell said. “For adults it might be more nostalgia, but it obviously resonates. It’s still emotions and feelings and funny things that [kids] can relate to.

“They were a really great addition to our home library and my kids enjoyed having the books, so I can understand why [they are still popular],” said Powell, whose three children are now 18, 16 and 12.

Obituary: Bernard Waber, children’s author, dies at 91

 
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