Book World

How a Southern white student stood by his black classmates during the Civil Rights era
Jim Auchmutey recounts the friendship a white student had with blacks and the abuse he got for it.
 
Review: ‘Spring Chicken: Stay Young Forever (or Die Trying)’ by Bill Gifford
(The Washington Post, March 27, 2015; 3:01 PM)
 
Blaine Harden dusts away the creation myth of North Korea’s founding
(The Washington Post, March 27, 2015; 3:01 PM)
 
Are humans the main driver of human evolution?
(The Washington Post, March 27, 2015; 3:01 PM)
 
The romance of Benjamin Disraeli and his wife
(The Washington Post, March 27, 2015; 3:00 PM)
 
Jonathan Waldman’s ‘Rust’ shows the substance’s corrosive power
(The Washington Post, March 27, 2015; 11:29 AM)
 
On a Memphis street, a microcosm of American culture
(The Washington Post, March 27, 2015; 11:29 AM)
 
The off-kilter universe of novelist Peter De Vries, back in print
(The Washington Post, March 26, 2015; 5:28 PM)
 
Paper, books and the art of collecting
(The Washington Post, March 25, 2015; 9:30 PM)
 
T.C. Boyle’s new novel takes us to America’s far-right edge
(The Washington Post, March 24, 2015; 8:53 PM)
 
The best science-fiction and fantasy books for March
(The Washington Post, March 24, 2015; 5:48 PM)
 
Four gimmick-free memoirs
(The Washington Post, March 24, 2015; 4:28 PM)
 
Book review: ‘Frog,’ by Mo Yan
(The Washington Post, March 23, 2015; 5:20 PM)
 
The thriller ‘The Bullet’ stars a Georgetown professor with a secret
(The Washington Post, March 22, 2015; 5:35 PM)
 
Two books explore the high cost of killing by drone
(The Washington Post, March 20, 2015; 5:04 PM)
 
What would privacy expert Louis Brandeis make of the digital age?
(The Washington Post, March 20, 2015; 5:03 PM)
 
Two books look at how modern technology ruins privacy
(The Washington Post, March 20, 2015; 4:34 PM)
 
In ‘Data-ism’ Steve Lohr gives his take on how Big Data will shape our future.
(The Washington Post, March 20, 2015; 4:22 PM)
 
The blur between acting, fakery
(The Washington Post, March 20, 2015; 4:00 PM)
 
‘The Contemporaries,’ by Roger White
(The Washington Post, March 20, 2015; 12:46 PM)
 
Lives intertwine in Charles Baxter’s ‘There’s Something I Want You to Do’
(The Washington Post, March 19, 2015; 6:24 PM)
 
A new biography of the most famous American of his time: Mark Twain
(The Washington Post, March 18, 2015; 5:37 PM)
 
Exploring the real-world effects — and the political ones — of our technological insecurity.
(The Washington Post, March 18, 2015; 4:38 PM)
 
The best new poetry books for March
(The Washington Post, March 17, 2015; 5:43 PM)
 
Novel will make you think twice about those beautiful fruits at the store
(The Washington Post, March 17, 2015; 5:08 PM)
 
‘The Poser,’ a masterful debut novel by Jacob Rubin
(The Washington Post, March 17, 2015; 4:49 PM)
 
Book review: ‘The Sasquatch Hunter’s Almanac,’ by Sharma Shields
(The Washington Post, March 16, 2015; 5:05 PM)
 
Allan Topol’s ‘The Washington Lawyer’ abounds with Beltway skullduggery
(The Washington Post, March 15, 2015; 5:08 PM)
 
In memoir, Barney Frank assesses his long tenure and the changing world around him
(The Washington Post, March 13, 2015; 4:13 PM)
 
Erik Larson recounts the fatal crossing of the ocean liner Lusitania
(The Washington Post, March 13, 2015; 4:13 PM)
 
How terrorism helped found Israel
(The Washington Post, March 13, 2015; 4:12 PM)
 
How humans became human
(The Washington Post, March 13, 2015; 4:12 PM)
 
How tiny animals stuffed with beans became a global craze
(The Washington Post, March 13, 2015; 4:11 PM)
 
A new look at a legendary art heist in ‘Master Thieves’ by Stephen Kurkjian
(The Washington Post, March 13, 2015; 11:38 AM)
 
‘The Battle of Versailles,’ by Robin Givhan
(The Washington Post, March 13, 2015; 11:37 AM)
 
Higher education isn’t in crisis
(The Washington Post, March 12, 2015; 3:27 PM)
 
How Asian art came to America: ‘The China Collectors’
(The Washington Post, March 11, 2015; 8:55 PM)
 
David Vann’s ‘Aquarium’ delves into the depths of mother-daughter tension
(The Washington Post, March 10, 2015; 9:53 PM)
 
The best in criticism: National Book Critics Circle Award finalists
(The Washington Post, March 10, 2015; 5:55 PM)
 
The best in poetry: National Book Critics Circle Award finalists
(The Washington Post, March 10, 2015; 4:56 PM)
 
A vivid return to the O.K. Corral in Mary Doria Russell’s novel ‘Epitaph’
(The Washington Post, March 9, 2015; 9:35 PM)
 
Spy vs. Spy: Olen Steinhauer’s thriller ‘All the Old Knives’
(The Washington Post, March 8, 2015; 5:25 PM)
 
Book review: “The Nuns of Sant’Ambrogio” by Hubert Wolf
(The Washington Post, March 7, 2015; 11:01 AM)
 
Stuart Scott’s posthumous memoir recounts his long fight with cancer
(The Washington Post, March 6, 2015; 4:03 PM)
 
In ‘My Fellow Prisoners,’ Mikhail Khodorkovsky recounts his prison years
(The Washington Post, March 6, 2015; 3:58 PM)
 
Chen Guangcheng recounts his life fighting injustice and brutality in China
(The Washington Post, March 6, 2015; 3:57 PM)
 
Book review: ‘Our Kids: The American Dream in Crisis’ by Robert D. Putnam
(The Washington Post, March 6, 2015; 3:48 PM)
 
In ‘Shrinks,’ Jeffrey A. Lieberman with Ogi Ogas explore the history of psychiatry
(The Washington Post, March 6, 2015; 3:35 PM)
 
Book review: ‘Moody Bitches,’ how moodiness is a source of power for women
(The Washington Post, March 6, 2015; 3:29 PM)
 
‘The Half That’s Never Been Told,’ by Doctor Dread
(The Washington Post, March 6, 2015; 12:34 PM)