Local Digest: Freezing rain feared across area

THE REGION

Freezing rain

Contrails from jet planes passing overhead intersect the National Museum of Art in Washington, Thursday morning, April 17, 2014. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite)

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feared across area

The Washington region appeared Tuesday night to be on the verge of becoming coated with ice as temperatures hovered near freezing and moisture swept northeast.

Forecasters expected that rain falling from warm upper levels of the atmosphere would freeze on contact with the cold ground.

Ice thicknesses anticipated by the National Weather Service ranged from about .01 inch in Southern Maryland to as much as a quarter inch in much of Montgomery and Fairfax counties. Such amounts could make early morning travel hazardous. As of 9 p.m., rain had yet to begin in most of the region.

— Martin Weil

MARYLAND

Bill targets company’s ties to the Holocaust

A bill introduced in the Maryland General Assembly would prohibit one of the firms bidding on the light-rail Purple Line project from winning the contract unless its parent company pays reparations to Holocaust victims transported on its trains.

The bill, sponsored by Sen. Joan Carter Conway (D-Baltimore), would affect Keolis, a rail company whose majority owner is SNCF, the government-owned French railway. Historians say SNCF trains carried nearly 76,000 Jews and other Nazi prisoners to the French-German border on their way to extermination camps during World War II.

Keolis is a member of one of four consortiums recently chosen by the Maryland Department of Transportation to bid the 16-mile Purple Line between Montgomery and Prince George’s counties. The 35-year contract is valued at more than $6 billion, one of the largest ever in the state.

Maryland officials have said they hope to choose a private partner by early 2015 and begin construction the same year.

— Katherine Shaver

virginia

GOP consultant paid more than known

A high-profile Republican strategist who backed Terry McAuliffe in last year’s gubernatorial election was paid $140,000 to consult on the campaign, far more than state disclosure forms had previously revealed.

Forms filed last month with the Federal Election Commission show that Boyd Marcus was paid $100,000 by DGA Action, a super PAC linked to the Democratic Governors Association. The bulk of those payments came just after McAuliffe defeated Ken Cuccinelli II (R).

McAuliffe (D) reported paying Marcus $40,000 last fall.

The new governor appointed Marcus to the ABC Board, a coveted job that pays over $100,000 a year. But the consultant has yet to be confirmed by the GOP-led House.

— Rachel Weiner

 
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