Columns

John Kelly

John Kelly

For 48 years, John ‘Doc’ Warman taught at Gonzaga. He was one of a kind.

Gonzaga College High School bids a fond farewell to a favorite teacher, a musical master of Latin and Greek.

John Kelly

John Kelly

Forty years ago, a moderate Republican championed environmentalism

Rolling on the river: Remembering the time a Maryland congressman spent a month on the Potomac.

John Kelly

John Kelly

From panda babies to stock market crashes, the news never stops

Anything happen when I was on vacation? A little too much, it sounds like.

John Kelly

John Kelly

Deleting the source code. Blowing up the roofing truck. You’re (not) fired!

A firing offense? Maybe, but these people somehow held on to their jobs.

John Kelly

John Kelly

Curious about that spooky Masonic temple on 16th Street? Let’s go inside.

The House of the Temple turns 100 this year. Now’s a good time to pay the Masonic headquarters a visit.

Colbert I. King

Colbert I. King

A summer so lawless in D.C., it feels like the Wild West

Killers seem to think that their lives are the only ones that matter.

Colbert I. King

Colbert I. King

More legal woes for Metro and Jim Graham

A developer’s lawsuit against WMATA is back on track.

PostPartisan

Colbert I. King

Appeals court sends Jim Graham case back to lower court

Colbert I. King

Colbert I. King

The harrowing lives of Christians in the Middle East

Their plight often goes unnoticed, but Christians in Iraq and many other countries live in fear.

Colbert I. King

Colbert I. King

The painfully slow corruption probe of Vincent Gray

The decision to prosecute or exonerate the former D.C. mayor has dragged on for much too long.

Mike Wise

Mike Wise

Once again with feeling

After 11 years as a sports columnist, the people and emotions linger more strongly than the stats and scores.

Mike Wise

Mike Wise

The smiling soul of the Wizards

In little more than a year with Washington, Marcin Gortat has formed relationships that go much deeper than merely on the floor.

Mike Wise

Mike Wise

The losses are hard enough to take

Rooting for Washington’s NFL team has become tiresome; one move by ownership could make it easier

Mike Wise

Mike Wise

No escaping this mess

London Fletcher, long above the fray, becomes latest to get sucked into Washington’s NFL morass.

Mike Wise

Mike Wise

A jogger saved this columnist’s life. Here’s how he repaid his rescuer.

On a cold January night, this Post staffer fell into the frozen-over C&O Canal. As he screamed for help, a jogger pulled him out.

Jennifer LaRue Huget

Jennifer LaRue Huget

Wonder how crayons and candy are made? Head to the factory.

Factory tours can be fun pit stops during family road trips.

Jennifer LaRue Huget

Jennifer LaRue Huget

The heat and the hazard: 9 facts about summer health

From athlete’s foot and poison ivy, to hand, foot and mouth disease and swimmer’s ear, things to know.

Jennifer LaRue Huget

Jennifer LaRue Huget

The Met, they’re not: The oddest museums in New York City

What’s on display? Gangsters, spoons, dirt, shrunken heads, taxidermy ... oh, and lots of sex.

Tom Sietsema

Tom Sietsema

Ask Tom: Rants, raves and questions on the DC dining scene

Washington Post food critic Tom Sietsema entertains your dining questions, rants and raves.

Tom Sietsema

Tom Sietsema

Ask Tom: Rants, raves and questions on the DC dining scene

Washington Post food critic Tom Sietsema entertains your dining questions, rants and raves.

Tom Sietsema

Tom Sietsema

Ask Tom: Rants, raves and questions on the DC dining scene

Washington Post food critic Tom Sietsema entertains your dining questions, rants and raves.

Tom Sietsema and Emily Chow

New Orleans: America's Best Food Cities

Food critic Tom Sietsema visited his sixth city in a 10-month-long project to eat, drink and shop his way through the nation's best food cities. See where he went in New Orleans.

Tom Sietsema ● photos by Melina Mara

The search for America’s best food cities: New Orleans

Washington Post restaurant critic Tom Sietsema continues his tour of dining capitals in the Big Easy.

Petula Dvorak

Petula Dvorak

She quit New Orleans after nearly dying during Hurricane Katrina

Lois Rice couldn’t reach her wheelchair when her childhood home flooded. She avoids thinking of it now.

Petula Dvorak

Petula Dvorak

Ranger School reality check: Women have been fighting — and dying — alongside combat units for years

Women are already on the front lines. They deserve to serve in combat units, with or without Ranger tabs.

Petula Dvorak

Petula Dvorak

Here’s what winning the Super Bowl looks like when you’re a female football player

The D.C. Divas just beat Dallas for the national title. So why is a star player back to work in her cubicle?

Petula Dvorak

Petula Dvorak

She came at the cop with a knife. He shot her. And it was all captured on video.

Footage of a D.C. police officer’s confrontation with Renita Nettles offers proof of what happened.

Petula Dvorak

Petula Dvorak

A basketball tournament disqualifies a team because one player is a girl. In 2015.

The Virginia kids were heading to the tournament finals when S.C. officials suddenly invoked a no-girls rule.

Robert McCartney

Robert McCartney

Here’s how D.C. business thinks region should react to painful sequestration

Private-sector and civic leaders urge governments to craft a plan to cope with historic budget cutbacks.

Robert McCartney

Robert McCartney

Hogan’s critics see ‘War on Baltimore’ as reflection of city’s diminished clout

The governor spurns Maryland’s top city as its political and economic muscle has fallen, analysts said.

Abigail Hauslohner and Robert McCartney

Can a costly summer jobs program lead to permanent work for youths?

D.C. Mayor Muriel E. Bowser has staked millions on a program she calls crucial but others say is broken.

Robert McCartney

Robert McCartney

Tourists getting in your way? There’s a $7 billion reason to be patient.

They crowd sidewalks, block streets and don’t know how to ride the Metro, but they bring D.C. big bucks.

Robert McCartney

Robert McCartney

How Republican Gov. Larry Hogan made his first big mass transit decision

Long a light-rail skeptic, Maryland’s new governor became convinced the Purple Line was worth it.

Courtland Milloy

Courtland Milloy

The new face of heroin calls for compassion, but the old was a scourge

When heroin was seen as an urban problem, officials treated its use more as a crime than a disease.

Courtland Milloy

Courtland Milloy

Cacophony conceals fallacy of D.C. mayor’s plan to address homicide rate

At a media event last week, Mayor Bowser was met by citizens who questioned her actions.

Courtland Milloy

Courtland Milloy

We’ve ignored a reason for homicides of blacks: Look at the enemy within

Black people cannot win the war on racism when black people are dying at the hands of other black people.

Courtland Milloy

Courtland Milloy

To make black lives matter, black people need to believe it

Hopelessness has caused some people to lose the ability to see themselves and others as worthy.

Courtland Milloy

Courtland Milloy

Yes, 14th Street may be better these days, but something vital is missing

The people who stayed through the bad days of 14th street aren’t reaping the rewards of the renewal.

The Federal Eye

Joe Davidson

Too many inmates, too few correctional officers: A lethal recipe in federal prisons

Last month’s assault on three staffers at the Canaan, Pa. federal prison demonstrate the risks in using regular prison staff as correctional officers.

The Federal Eye

Joe Davidson

Federal employees and contractors face danger, even death, just doing their jobs

A memorial service was held Thursday for Idrissa Camara, a contract security officer at a federal building in New York, who was killed last week by a frustrated former federal employee who previously called the Federal Diary.

The Federal Eye

Joe Davidson

Re-elected union chief vows to fight “very hostile Congress” over feds’ benefits and job security

J. David Cox Sr. begins his second term as president of the American Federation of Government Employees by playing defense against Republican plans to cut federal benefits, the massive federal employee data breach and now efforts by otherwise allies to target union “official time.“

The Federal Eye

Joe Davidson

VA scandal fallout: federal employee groups fight over ‘hit list’ targeting managers

The fallout from the VA scandal has federal employee organizations that are often partners in a fight over a ‘hit list’ against agency supervisors.

The Federal Eye

Joe Davidson

Federal supervisors hit union ‘hit list’ against VA managers

Two organizations representing federal supervisors have complained to congressional leaders about a “management hit list” compiled by the union for VA employees.