Decision on whether to charge David Gregory could come soon, D.C. attorney general says

A decision on whether to pursue criminal charges after an incident in which “Meet the Press” host David Gregory held what appeared to be a high-capacity ammunition magazine on national television could come by week’s end, the District’s attorney general said Wednesday.

Attorney General Irvin B. Nathan confirmed that he had received an investigative report from the police department. He will likely determine whether to pursue charges in the case by the end of the week, Nathan said.

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The “Meet the Press” host is under investigation by D.C. police for displaying what appeared to be an illegal high-capacity ammunition clip in an interview with the NRA’s Wayne LaPierre Sunday.

The “Meet the Press” host is under investigation by D.C. police for displaying what appeared to be an illegal high-capacity ammunition clip in an interview with the NRA’s Wayne LaPierre Sunday.

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Nathan’s office oversees prosecutions of some low-level offenses.

Possessing a magazine capable of holding more than 10 rounds, even if it is empty, is a misdemeanor that can carry a sentence of up to one year in jail and a $1,000 fine.

Gregory held the prop during a Dec. 23 broadcast in which he interviewed Wayne LaPierre, chief executive of the National Rifle Association, about the school massacre in Newtown, Conn.

Gregory has not publicly discussed the case. NBC has declined repeated requests for comment.

Nathan said NBC had been “cooperative” with investigators. He declined to say whether anyone at the network consulted police before the prop was used on television.

The police department has said NBC asked it whether it was permissible to show the magazine and was told that it was not.

 
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