Delay sought in sentencing for Thomas Gore


Thomas Gore pleaded guilty to helping secretly finance a minor candidate in the campaign to boost Gray’s chances of defeating then-Mayor Adrian M. Fenty in the Democratic primary. (Katherine Frey/The Washington Post)
December 12, 2012

A federal prosecutor said Wednesday that the investigation into D.C. Mayor Vincent Gray’s 2010 campaign is “still ongoing” and asked a federal judge to further delay sentencing of a key campaign aide.

The disclosure by Assistant U.S. Attorney Ellen Chubin Epstein came during a status conference in the District’s federal court for Thomas W. Gore, the former assistant campaign treasurer and longtime confidant of the mayor’s.

In May, Gore pleaded guilty to helping secretly finance a minor candidate in the campaign to boost Gray’s chances of defeating then-Mayor Adrian M. Fenty in the Democratic primary. He also admitted to destroying a notebook that showed the payoffs to the candidate, Sulaimon Brown, and lying about it to federal agents.

Epstein asked the judge for more time for the government to get the “maximum benefit from Gore’s cooperation.”

Gore’s attorney, Frederick D. Cooke Jr., said his client was eager to proceed to sentencing to “come to closure.” Cooke said Gore has not testified before a federal grand jury but is willing to cooperate.

U.S. District Judge Colleen Kollar-Kotelly pressed Epstein about whether the government anticipates getting additional information from Gore or is just leaving the door open to having him testify in a related matter.

“It’s some of both,” Epstein said.

Gore is one of three Gray campaign aides who have pleaded guilty to a federal crime. He could face 12 to 18 months in prison, although prosecutors could recommend a lesser sentence depending on the extent of his cooperation.

After conferring privately with the attorneys Wednesday, Kollar-Kotelly agreed to give the government an additional three months before setting a date for sentencing. Another hearing is scheduled for March 28.

Ann covers legal affairs in the District and Maryland for the Washington Post. Ann previously covered state government and politics in California, New Hampshire and Maryland. She joined the Post in 2005.
Comments
Show Comments
Most Read Local