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Rappers record song, rob music studio

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During the wee hours of the morning Friday, two men arrived at a Laurel recording studio and asked to cut a rap song. They were invited in, and recorded a profanity-laced ode to a notorious Chicago gang leader.

When the session was over shortly before 2 a.m., police say, the men went outside, grabbed a handgun and robbed the people who had helped them in the studio, authorities said.

The robber-rappers took phones, cash, credit cards and jewelry from a half-dozen victims, according to police, who have released the song, hoping someone will recognize their voices and turn them in.

As their song is now getting immediate distribution, it was unclear if they committed the robbery as a stunt to promote their soundtrack, or whether they simply preyed on the crew in the studio.

Either way, “brazen is a good way of putting it,” said Laurel city spokesman Pete Piringer.

Piringer said the men arrived at Copy Catz Studioz, in the 600 block of Lafayette Avenue, sometime before 1 a.m. They did not have an appointment, Piringer said, but asked the men inside the warehouse-like studio if they could cut a track.

They rapped about Larry Hoover, a notorious Chicago criminal who led the Gangster Disciples and later ran wide-reaching criminal and drug enterprise from prison.

“I feel like Larry Hoover,” they rapped. “I gotta get my money now.”

When they were done, Piringer said, the men went outside and retrieved a small, black handgun and returned.

“They were not hiding their identities or their faces,” Piringer said.

They men made five or six people in the studio get on the couch and took their valuables, Piringer said. Then, they left.

At about 2:30 a.m., one of the victims flagged down a police car near the studio and told an officer what happened. At that point, three of the victims had left, and police took a report from the three remaining victims, Piringer said.

Piringer called the event unusual, but added: “Nothing really surprises me anymore.”

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