T.C. Williams students suspected of taking ‘upskirt’ photos of teachers

Four students at T.C. Williams High School in Alexandria are suspected of taking inappropriate photos of their teachers, according to search warrants filed in Alexandria Circuit Court.

The students are suspected of taking “upskirt” photos of two female teachers last month. According to affidavits, one student told police that when he walked into his second-period class May 15, several students started encouraging him — chanting, “Photo, photo, photo” — to take a picture of the teacher. He used his phone to take a picture of her from behind. He also received a photo on his phone that had been taken up the teacher’s skirt, he said.

A second student told police that during the same class, he held his phone under the teacher’s skirt and took a video, according to the warrants.

The video did not come out, he said, and he deleted it immediately. He said he handed his phone to a third student who took two photos up the teacher’s skirt. A witness recalled seeing the third student take an upskirt photo and being urged by him to do the same. The witness reported the incident to Dean Rene Cadogan.

A fourth student admitted to taking a picture up the dress of another female teacher three days earlier, according to an affidavit. A female witness reported that incident to the dean.

One student, an 18-year-old, has been charged with the unlawful photographing of a non-consenting person, a misdemeanor. Police said they are still investigating.

“We take the allegations very seriously and are cooperating fully with the police,” school system spokeswoman Kelly Alexander said. “We will take any necessary disciplinary actions and do all we can to protect our teachers and students in the classroom.”

Upskirt photos were explicitly outlawed by Virginia legislators in 2005 after prosecutors were unable to charge a man who used a video camera to look up teenage girls’ skirts at a Norfolk mall with anything more than disorderly conduct. Several other states have passed similar laws, including Maryland in 2006. Such photos have been banned on federal land since 2004.

Rachel Weiner covers local politics for The Washington Post.
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