D.C. community calendar, Feb. 14 to 21, 2013

February 12, 2013
Thursday, FEB. 14

Chess club, tailored for ages 2 and older. 10 a.m. Thursdays, Woodridge Library, 1801 Hamlin St. NE. Free. 202-541-6226.

Snugglers, education specialist Lee Coykendall invites parents or care providers with one child in a snuggly for a special tour of the conservatory; no strollers or siblings. 10 a.m. Thursdays, U.S. Botanic Garden, 100 Maryland Ave. SW. Free. 202-225-8333.

“Harriet Tubman: The Chosen One,” a performance by Gwendolyn Briley-Strand followed by a question-and-answer session. 10:30 a.m. and 1 p.m., THEARC Theater, 1901 Mississippi Ave. SE. Free. 202-889-5901 or www.thearcdc.org.

Behind the scenes cathedral tour,for age 11 and older, see gargoyles and stained-glass windows, and climb a lot of stairs for a panoramic view of the city; take a camera. 10:30 a.m. and 1:30 p.m. most weekdays, Washington National Cathedral, Wisconsin and Massachusetts avenues NW. $15. 202-537-6200 or www.nationalcathedral.org.

Step Afrika! Reads,a program that promotes reading and literacy skills for ages 2-5 with a special story time followed by a mini-workshop with the artists from Step Afrika’s newest production. 11 a.m., Hill Center at the Old Naval Hospital, 921 Pennsylvania Ave. SE. Free. 202-549-4172 or www.hillcenterdc.org.

The Building Zone, for age 6 and younger with an adult, activities focusing on the trades within the building-arts community. 10 a.m.-4 p.m. Mondays-Saturdays, 11 a.m.-4 p.m. Sundays, National Building Museum, 401 F St. NW. $3. 202-272-2448.

Kluge Center lecture, Fellow Joel Frykholm discusses “The Lost Tycoon: Rediscovering George Kleine, Reframing Early American Cinema.” Noon, Library of Congress, Room 119, Jefferson Building, 10 First St. SE. Free. 202-707-3302.

The language of flowers, Amy Brecount White, author of “Forget-Her-Nots,” demonstrates how to improve and enliven your communication skills using the Victorian language of flowers, explaining their literary origins and the technique of assembling a “tussie-mussie,” or nosegay. 1 p.m., U.S. Botanic Garden, Conservatory Garden Court, 100 Maryland Ave. SW. Free. 202-225-8333.

Library Scrabble, 1 p.m. Thursdays, Chevy Chase Library, 5625 Connecticut Ave. NW. Free. 202-282-
0021.

Teen game night, for ages 12-19, participate in video games, board games, trading card games and more. 4-6 p.m. Thursdays, Lamond-Riggs Library, Meeting Room No. 1, 5401 South Dakota Ave. NE. Free. 202-541-6255.

Romance the Evening: Cocktails in the Conservatory, for adults, wine, champagne, chocolate-covered strawberries and other treats at the 1816 National Historic Landmark mansion, with music to accompany your stroll through the house and its collections. 5-7 p.m., Tudor Place, 1644 31st St. NW. $20 per couple; $12 per individual. 202-965-0400. Register: tudorplaceromancetheevening.eventbrite.com.

Classical music concert, students from the Juilliard School perform as part of the Kennedy Center’s Conservatory Project. 6 p.m., Kennedy Center, Terrace Theater, 2700 F St. NW. Free. 202-467-4600

“Our Town,” on the 75th anniversary of the Thornton Wilder play, Stephen Rayne directs an updated version. 7:30 p.m. Tuesdays-Fridays, 2 and 7:30 p.m. Saturdays-Sundays, 11 a.m. and 7:30 p.m. Feb. 21, no evening performance on Feb. 17 and 24, Ford’s Theatre, 511 10th St. NW. $15-$62. 202-347-4833 or www.fords.org.

An Evening with Debra Tidwell,the local jazz vocalist and cabaret artist performs a musical variety show, “Love . . . and All Its Symptoms,” partly funded by the D.C. Commission on the Arts and Humanities. 7:30 p.m., Hill Center at the Old Naval Hospital, 921 Pennsylvania Ave. SE. $15. 202-549-4172 or www.hillcenterdc.org.

“Hughie,” Eugene O’Neill’s play about a man whose illusions of a grand lifestyle waver after the death of the stranger who quietly validated his larger-than-life confidence. 7:30 p.m. Thursdays and Fridays, 2 and 8 p.m. Saturdays, 2 and 7:30 p.m. Sundays, 7:30 p.m. Tuesdays-Wednesdays, through March 17. Lansburgh Theatre, 450 Seventh St. NW. $43-$100, discounts for military, students, seniors and patrons age 35 and younger. 202-
547-1122 or www.shakespearetheatre.org.

“Good People,” a humor-filled play about class, fate and economic hardship, written by Pulitzer Prize-winner David Lindsay-Abaire, directed by Jackie Maxwell, starring Johanna and Andrew Long. 8 p.m. Thursdays-Fridays, 2 and 8 p.m. Saturdays-Sundays, noon Feb. 27, Arena Stage, 1101 Sixth St. SW. $40-$85, subject to change and based on availability. 202-488-3300 or www.arenastage.org.

The Skin of Our Teeth,”Thornton Wilder’s 1942 Pulitzer Prize-winning story of an American family’s survival in the face of incredible obstacles. 8 p.m. Thursday-Friday, 2 and 8 p.m. Saturday, American University, Harold and Sylvia Greenberg Theatre, 4200 Massachusetts Ave. NW. $15. 202-885-2587 or auarts@american.edu.

“The House of the Spirits,”Caridad Svich’s play based on Isabel Allende’s novel that spans four generations of political, social and familial upheaval of a Latin American family, performed in Spanish with English surtitles; a reception follows Saturday’s performance. 8 p.m. Thursdays-Saturdays, 3 p.m. Sundays, continues through March 10, GALA Theatre atTivoli, 3333 14th St. NW. 800-494-8497 202-234-7174 or www.galatheatre.org.

Pink Martini in concert. 8 p.m., Kennedy Center, Concert Hall, 2700 F St. NW. $30-$90. 202-785-9727 or www.wpas.org.

Henry V,” the historic Shakespeare play, directed by Robert Richmond. 7:30 p.m. Tuesdays-Thursdays, 8 p.m. Fridays, 2 and 8 p.m. Saturdays, 2 and 7:30 p.m. Sundays, through March 3, Folger Shakespeare Library, 201 East Capitol St. SE. $30-$40. Regular shows, $30-$68. 202-544-7077 or www.folger.edu/theatre.

“Free Men,” the French film about a young unemployed Algerian who avoids going to jail for marketeering by agreeing to spy on a Paris Mosque suspected of aiding Muslim Resistance agents and helping North African Jews with false certificates; in French with English subtitles. 8 p.m., Avalon Theatre, 5612 Connecticut Ave. NW. $11; students, $9; seniors, $8.25; age 12 and younger, $8. 202-966-6000.

Friday, FEB. 15

Friday Morning Music Club recital, a performance of works by David Rubenstein, Lawrence Ink, Winifred Hyson and Mark Simon. Noon, Calvary Baptist Church, 755 Eighth St. NW. Free. 202-333-2075.

Secrets of Stonehenge,” documentary film detailing how a new generation of researchers finds important clues to its enduring mystery. 7 p.m., Hill Center at the Old Naval Hospital, 921 Pennsylvania Ave. SE. Free. 202-549-4172 or www.hillcenterdc.org.

“No Men Allowed a.k.a. No Entry for Men,” Rambod Javan’s hilarious 2011 film about students who try to hook up a new male teacher at their school with their strict headmistresss, believing that love will make her loosen the school’s rules, in Persian with English subtitles. 7 p.m., Freer Gallery of Art, Meyer Auditorium, Jefferson Drive and 12th Street SW. Free. 202-633-1000.

Oscar-nominated short films of 2013, “Head Over Heels,” “Maggie Simpson in ‘The Longest Daycare,’ ” “Paperman,” “Fresh Guacamole” and “Adam and Dog.” Call theater for showtimes. Avalon Theatre, 5612 Connecticut Ave. NW. $11.50; students, $8.75; seniors; bargain show, $8.25; military and children, $8.50, $8. 202-966-6000.

Saturday, FEB. 16

Beyond the Basics Genealogy, archivist Claire Kluskens explains how to find records for your historical or genealogical research that are not online or on microfilm. 10 a.m., National Archives, 700 Pennsylvania Ave. NW. Free. 202-357-5000.

Discover Engineering Family Day, for ages 4-12, learn how engineering is involved in everyday life; make slime, build a rocket, construct a boat and put it through a lock system, learn about the science of popcorn, experience a tsunami wave tank; activities with Curious George and the Cat in the Hat from PBS Kids. 10 a.m.-4:30 p.m., National Building Museum, 401 F St. NW. Free. 202-272-2448. www.nbm.org.

Miniature Shrines to Love and Humanity, with art therapist Rebecca Wilkinson, learn strategies for increasing love in your life and in the lives of others; design a small shrine to create a meaningful visual reminder. 10 a.m.-3 p.m., Smith Center for Healing and the Arts, 1632 U St. NW. $45. 202-483-8600 or www.smithcenter.org .

Presidents family day, a day of patriotic crafts, performances and more dedicated to the nation’s famous leaders, meet some special guests and pose for your photo with them. 11:30 a.m.-3 p.m., National Portrait Gallery, and Smithsonian American Art Museum, Eighth and F streets NW. Free. 202-633-1000.

Help! I’m Stuck genealogy clinic, sign up for an archivist appointment to answer your research questions. Noon-4 p.m., National Archives, 700 Pennsylvania Ave. NW. Free. 202-357-5000.

Celebration of the Live Butterfly Pavilion, view the exhibit “Butterflies + Plants: Partners in Evolution” as the center celebrates its fifth anniversary, special arts and crafts activities for children of all ages, meet museum educators and learn about metamorphosis and native butterfly species of our region. 1-4 p.m., National Museum of Natural History, 10th Street and Constitution Avenue NW. Free. 202-633-1000 or www.butterflies.si.edu.

Knit and Lit, informal group of knitters and readers, take knitting or needlework project to work on as you share patterns and stories. 3 p.m. Saturdays, Georgetown Library, 3307 M St. NW. Free. 202-724-8783.

Violin lessons, for age 12 and older, taught by violinist Clarice Carter, take your own instrument. 3:30 p.m. Saturdays, Woodridge Library, 1801 Hamlin St. NE. Free. 202-541-6226.

Friday Morning Music Club recital, a student recital of classical music. 4 p.m., Ingleside at Rock Creek, 3050 Military Rd. NW. Free. 202-333-2075.

American University Orchestra Concerto and Aria Competition, the annual competition features the university’s undergraduate instrumentalists and vocalists performing concerto movements and arias in two rounds. First round. 7 p.m. Saturday. Final candidates perform. 3 p.m. Sunday., Abramson Family Recital Hall, Katzen Arts Center, 4400 Massachusetts Ave. NW. Free. 202-885-2787 or auarts@american.edu.

Violin and piano recital, violinist Hilary Hahn and pianist Cory Smythe perform works by Beethoven, Bach and others. 8 p.m., Kennedy Center, Concert Hall, 2700 F St. NW. $35-$95. Free. 202-785-9727.

“My Big Fat Gay Wedding,” concert celebrating recent gains in the fight for gay marriage equality with the live on stage wedding of two lucky Maryland grooms, love songs, and guest singer songwriter gay heartthrob Matt Alber. 8 p.m., George Washington University, Lisner Auditorium, 730 21st St. NW. $25-$55. 202-293-1548 or www.GMCW.org.

Sunday, FEB. 17

Portrait story days, listen to a story about Abraham Lincoln, our 16th president, and create a special piece of art to take home. 2-5 p.m., National Portrait Gallery, Eighth and F streets NW. Free. 202-633-1000.

Music performance, the Avalon String Quartet performs with pianist Winston Choi in honor of Black History Month, with music by composer-in-residence Jeffrey Mumford; latecomers not admitted. 6:30 p.m., National Gallery of Art, West Building Garden Court, 600 Constitution Ave. NW. Free. 202-842-6941.

Monday, FEB. 18

Library of Congress open house, for visitors to the Jefferson Building’s Great Hall and exhibitions from 8:30 a.m.-4:30 p.m. with a special Main Reading Room program. 10 a.m.-3 p.m., Library of Congress, Jefferson Building, 10 First St. SE. Free. 202-707-8000.

Presidents’ Day at the Lincoln Memorial, National Park Service rangers in Colonial and Civil War period clothing host the program and invite visitors to sign a “Thank you” sheet with a period quill pen. 11 a.m.-
1 p.m. and 2-3:30 p.m. Lincoln Memorial, 23rd Street NW and West Potomac Park. Free. Call Mike Rose, 202-438-9667.

Chess club, for children and teens. 5:30 p.m., Woodridge Library, 1801 Hamlin St. NE. Free. 202-541-6226.

“An Evening with Mark Russell,” the piano-playing political satirist performs material ripped from the headlines. 7 p.m., Ford’s Theatre, 511 10th St. NW. $20-$64. 202-347-4833 or www.fords.org.

President’s Day program, costumed interpreters lead historic tours, 18th century games, dancing, crafts and views of the largest collection of Washington artifacts outside Mount Vernon. 10 a.m.-noon, Tudor Place, 1644 31st St. NW. $10; children, $5. 202-965-0400. Register: tudorplaceallaboutgeorge.eventbrite.com .

Tuesday, FEB. 19

“Failure and Memory: How the Rescue of Jews During the Holocaust is Depicted in Post War German Film,” a lecture by historian Kobi Kabalek. Noon, Library of Congress, Madison Building, Mary Pickford Theater, 101 Independence Ave. SE. Free. 202-707-9897.

Music of the Civil War: Battle Hymns and Bugle Calls that Shaped an Era, a lecture by the music division’s Robin Rausch. Noon, Library of Congress, Jefferson Building, Whittall Pavilion, 10 First St. SE. Free. 202-707-5502.

Classical piano recital, a performance by Amanda Halstead, instructor at the Levine School of Music. 12:10 p.m., Church of the Epiphany, 1317 G St. NW. Suggested donation, $5. 202-347-2635, Ext. 20.

Homework cafe, a quiet place for students in grades kindergarten through 12 to work on homework assignments. 3-5 p.m. Tuesdays, Tenley-Friendship Library, 4450 Wisconsin Ave. NW. Free. 202-727-1488.

Tippi toes hip-hop dance class, for ages 7 and older, learn choreography and dances. 5:30-6:15 p.m. Tuesdays through May 7, Hill Center at the Old Naval Hospital, 921 Pennsylvania Ave. SE. $75 per month plus $30 registration fee. 202-549-4172 or www.hillcenterdc.org.

The Man With the Iron Fists,” rapper RZA wrote, directed and co-stars in this action film about a search for gold in feudal China, with Russell Crowe and Lucy Liu. 6 p.m., Martin Luther King Jr. Memorial Library, Room A-5, lower lever, 901 G St. NW. Free. 202-727-0321.

Bellevue teen chess club, for players of all skill levels. 6 p.m. Tuesdays, William O. Lockridge/Bellevue Library, 115 Atlantic St. SW. Free. 202-243-1184.

Civil Rights: Where Do We Go From Here? Wade Henderson, law professor and chief executive of the Leadership Conference on Civil and Human Rights, discusses the issue. 6:30 p.m., Martin Luther King Jr. Memorial Library, 901 G St. NW. Free. 202-727-0321.

Stories of Community Development in D.C., a panel of D.C. redevelopment experts discusses three decades of development and how that history informs the future of national policy toward cities and neighborhoods. 6:30-8 p.m., National Building Museum, 401 F St. NW. Free, registration required at www.nbm.org. 202-272-2448.

Wednesday, FEB. 20

Beyond the Basics Genealogy: Civil War medical records, National Archives specialist Nancy Wing discusses the progression of medicine and how medical treatment was documented during the Civil War for the Union and the Confederacy, including images of medical records, hospital sites, equipment and prominent figures who made a difference for both sides. 11 a.m., National Archives, 700 Pennsylvania Ave. NW. Free. 202-357-5000.

Who was Ernest Shackleton? expedition leader Jo Davies discusses “By Endurance We Conquer: Ernest Shackleton and Lessons of Leadership for the Imperial Trans-Antarctic Centenary Expedition 2014.” 11:30 a.m., Library of Congress, Madison Building, West Dining Room, 101 Independence Ave. SE. Free. 202-707-7450.

Book talk, author Bland Simpson discusses his book “Two Captains from Carolina: Moses Grandy, John Newland Maffitt, and the Coming of the Civil War” in honor of Black History Month; a question-and-answer session follows. Noon, U.S. Navy Memorial, Naval Heritage Center, 701 Pennsylvania Ave. NW. Free. 202-737-2300 or www.navymemorial.org.

Civil War lecture, Connie Carter of the science, technology, and business division discusses a Confederate receipt (recipe) book and how people survived on the home front with limited supplies. Noon, Library of Congress, Southwest Gallery, Jefferson Building, 10 First St. SE. Free. 202-707-9203.

Author talk, Tom Piazza discusses his new book, The Southern Journey of Alan Lomax: Words, Photographs, and Music .” Noon, Library of Congress, Madison Building, Montpelier Room, 101 Independence Ave. SE. Free. 202-707-5502.

The Cinderella No One Knows: A Grimm Brothers Tale, a lecture by George Mason University’s Margaret Yocom. Noon, Library of Congress, Jefferson Building, Whittall Pavilion, 10 First St. SE. Free. 202-707-5510.

The Scientist is In: Sant Ocean Hall, a marine scientist at the exhibit shows specimens and artifacts and talks about field studies, specimen collection, new discoveries and more. 1-3 p.m., National Museum of Natural History, Sant Ocean Hall, first floor, 10th Street and Constitution Avenue NW. Free. 202-1000.

Thomas Jefferson and slavery, a National Park Service ranger discusses the former president’s writings and true thoughts on slavery. 1 and 5 p.m., Thomas Jefferson Memorial, 900 Ohio Dr. SW. Free. Call David Rappel, 202-359-1533.

The making of a SEAL, former U.S. Navy SEAL trainer and author Rorke Denver discusses his book,Damn Few: Making the Modern SEAL Warrior,” about the recruiting and training of these elite warriors, and discusses his own experiences; a question-and-answer session follows. 6:30 p.m., U.S. Navy Memorial, Naval Heritage Center, 701 Pennsylvania Ave. NW. Free. 202-737-2300 or www.navymemorial.org.

Chess for kids, instruction for all ages and all skill levels. 4 p.m. Wednesdays, Cleveland Park Library, 3310 Connecticut Ave. NW. 202-282-3080; and 5:30 p.m. Wednesdays, Francis A. Gregory Library, 3660 Alabama Ave. SE. 202-645-4297. Free.

“The Sublime World of Noel Coward,” get acquainted with the playwright, composer, film and television performer, poet, short-story writer, painter and, briefly, wartime espionage agent; Keith Merrill, artistic director of the New York-based Noel and Company, pays tribute to Coward’s work and his contributions to American and British theater using Coward’s words, letters, photographs, songs, clips and more. 6:45 p.m., S. Dillon Ripley Center, 1100 Jefferson Dr. SW. $25. 202-633-3030.

Great Black Women, for age 13 and older, a lecture by historian C.R. Gibbs. 7 p.m., Woodridge Library, 1801 Hamlin St. NE. Free. 202-541-6226.

The Artist,” Michel Hazanavicius’s entertaining 2011 film set in Hollywood during the twilight of its silent era, winner of five Academy Awards, starring Jean Dujardin and Berenice Bejo. 7 p.m., Smithsonian American Art Museum, Kogod Courtyard, Eighth and F streets NW. Free. 202-633-1000.

Race,” performance of David Mamet’s drama that ruthlessly examines questions of guilt, betrayal, sexual consent and racial prejudice. 7:30 p.m. Wednesdays and Thursdays, 3 p.m. and 8 p.m. Saturdays (8 p.m. only Feb. 16), 3 p.m. and 7:30 p.m. Sundays, noon March 1 and 8. Through March 17. Washington D.C. Jewish Community Center, Theater J, 1529 16th St. NW. $45, seniors and members $40, group of 10-plus $35, seniors group of 10-plus, $30. 800-494-8497 or www.theaterj.org or www.boxofficetickets.com.

Thursday, FEB. 21

Advance Directive/Durable power of attorney, focusing on health care, presented by Nneka Mokwunye, a staff member at Washington Hospital Center’s Center for Ethics. Participants will receive an Advance Directive document. 10 a.m.-noon, Washington Hospital Center, Center for Ethics, Siegel Auditorium, Room C-1221, 110 Irving St. NW. Free, registration required. Call Ruby Price, 202-877-6213.

Portrait Gallery tour, historian Jim Barber brings you face-to-face with Booker T. Washington, Andrew Carnegie and Theodore Roosevelt. Noon, meet at the sculpture of Booker T. Washington, National Portrait Gallery, first floor east, Eighth and F streets NW. Free. 202-633-1000.

The Scientist is In, the National Science Foundation’s John Yellen answers questions about touchable objects and discusses his research on the processes which led to the emergence of behaviorally modern humans. Noon-2 p.m., National Museum of Natural History, David H. Koch Hall of Human Origins, 1st Floor, 10th Street and Constitution Avenue NW. Free. 202-1000.

Cooking gluten-free, gardening specialist Adrienne Cook and nutritionist Danielle Cook Navidi demonstrate ways of making familiar dishes using fresh, local ingredients. Noon-1:30 p.m., U.S. Botanic Garden, 100 Maryland Ave. SW. Free. 202-225-8333.

Human behavior, John Yellen of the National Science Foundation answers questions about touchable objects and discusses his research on the processes that led to the emergence of behaviorally modern humans. Noon-2 p.m., National Museum of Natural History, David H. Koch Hall of Human Origins, first floor, 10th Street and Constitution Avenue NW. Free. 202-633-1000.

Scrabble at the Library, for adults. 1 p.m. Thursdays, Chevy Chase Library, 5625 Connecticut Ave. NW. Free. 202-282-0021.

“Great Black Women,” for age 13 and older, a lecture by historian C. R. Gibbs. 7 p.m., Woodridge Library, 1801 Hamlin St. NE. Free. 202-541-6226.

An Evening with a park ranger, a National Park Service Ranger leads a tour and discusses the history of the memorials; take water and a flashlight. 7-9 p.m. Thursday-Saturday, National World War II Memorial, Survey Lodge, 17th Street and Constitution Avenue NW. Free. 202-426-6841

Current events talk, political commentator Bill Press and columnist Clarence Page discuss the news of the day. 7 p.m., Hill Center at the Old Naval Hospital, 921 Pennsylvania Ave. SE. Free. 202-549-4172 or www.hillcenterdc.org.

Wagner’s opera “Parsifal,” musicologist Saul Lilienstein discusses the German composer’s work. 7:30 p.m., Goethe-Institut, 812 Seventh St. NW. Free. 703-370-3796.

“Inferno,” by Dante, Laura Giannarelli directs the Washington Stage Guild adaptation, a physical re-imagining of the original dramatization of one of the Western world’s greatest texts. 7:30 p.m. Thursday, 8 p.m. Fridays, 2:30 and 8 p.m. Saturdays, 2:30 p.m. Sundays, Undercroft Theatre, Massachusetts Avenue and Ninth Street NW. Fridays/Saturdays evenings, $50; Thursdays and matinees, $40; seniors, $10 discount, students, half price. 240-582-0050.

Idan Cohen Dance Company, performance of “Mad Siren,” the latest work by the Israeli choreographer, set to Mozart’s solo piano sonatas; a discussion follows. 7:30 p.m., American University, Abramson Family Recital Hall, Katzen Arts Center, 4400 Massachusetts Ave. NW. Free. RSVP: cutler@american.edu. 202-885-2787.

Theater, “Wecycling,” an original piece by Caleen Jennings and the ensemble, examining life’s cycles and using found objects, popular media, dreamscapes, music, movement, memory and myth. 8 p.m. Feb. 21-22, 2 and 8 p.m. Feb. 23, 8 p.m. March 1, 2 and 8 p.m. March 2-3, American University, Katzen Arts Center, Studio Theatre, 4400 Massachusetts Ave. NW. $15; seniors, $10. 202-885-2787 or auarts@american.edu.

— Compiled by Gerri Marmer

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