D.C. community calendar, Feb. 7 to 14, 2013

February 7, 2013
Thursday, FEB. 7

Snugglers, education specialist Lee Coykendall invites parents or care providers with one child in a snuggly for a special tour of the conservatory; no strollers or siblings. 10 a.m. Thursdays, U.S. Botanic Garden, 100 Maryland Ave. SW. Free. 202-225-8333.

Computer class: Microsoft Power Point, 10 a.m.- noon., Southwest Library, 900 Wesley Pl. SW. Free. 202-724-4752.

Woodridge chess club, instruction for children and teenagers. 10 a.m. Thursdays, Woodridge Library, 1801 Hamlin St. NE. Free. 202-541-6226.

The Building Zone, for age 6 and younger with an adult, activities focusing on the trades within the building-arts community. 10 a.m.-4 p.m. Mondays-Saturdays, 11 a.m.-4 p.m. Sundays, National Building Museum, 401 F St. NW. $3. 202-272-2448.

Behind the scenes cathedral tour, for age 11 and older, see gargoyles and stained-glass windows, and climb a lot of stairs for a panoramic view of the city; take a camera. 10:30 a.m. and 1:30 p.m. most weekdays, Washington National Cathedral, Wisconsin and Massachusetts avenues NW. $15. 202-537-6200 or www.nationalcathedral.org.

The Hour of Peril: The Secret Plot to Murder Lincoln Before the Civil War,” Daniel Stashower discusses his book. Noon, Library of Congress, Madison Building, Dining Room A, 101 Independence Ave. SE. Free. 202-707-5221.

History talk, visiting fellow Stefanie Schaefer delivers a lecture on “Jonathan Going South: The Yankee and the Making of American National Character.” Noon, Library of Congress, Room LJ119, Jefferson Building, 10 First St. SE. Free. 202-707-3302.

“The Rise, Fall and Rise of Detroit,” a discussion on how the city, once the nation’s fifth-largest, lost nearly 60 percent of its population since the mid-1950s, and solutions for its revitalization. 12:30-2 p.m., National Building Museum, 401 F St. NW. $12, members and students $10; ticket price includes admission to the exhibitions “Detroit Is No Dry Bones” and “Detroit Disassembled.” Prepaid registration required. 202-272-2448 or www.nbm.org.

Library Scrabble, 1 p.m. Thursdays, Chevy Chase Library, 5625 Connecticut Ave. NW. Free. 202-282-0021.

Teen game night, for ages 12-19, participate in video games, board games, trading card games and more. 4-6 p.m. Thursdays, Lamond-Riggs Library, Meeting Room No. 1, 5401 South Dakota Ave. NE. Free. 202-541-6255.

Classical concert, students from the Afghanistan National Institute of Music play selections of traditional Afghan and Indian music, as well as William Harvey’s “The Four Seasons of Afghanistan,” a recasting of Vivaldi’s masterwork in an Afghan context. 6 p.m., Kennedy Center, Concert Hall, 2700 F St. NW. Free. 202-467-4600.

Sacred Texts: The Literature and Art of Faith, Louisa Woodville, of the art history department at George Mason University, discusses the range of early, medieval and Renaissance texts that Jews and Christians produced as their religions developed, and a look at the Eliot Indian Bible and the 2008 St. John’s Bible, both housed at the Library of Congress. 6:45 p.m., S. Dillon Ripley Center, 1100 Jefferson Dr. SW. $42. 202-633-3030.

An evening with a park ranger, a National Park Service ranger leads a tour and discusses the history of the memorials; take water and a flashlight. 7-9 p.m. Thursday-Saturday, National World War II Memorial, Survey Lodge, 17th Street and Constitution Avenue NW. Free. 202-426-6841.

The Emancipation Proclamation in art and documents, Eleanor Jones Harvey, chief curator at the Smithsonian American Art Museum, and Michael Hussey, historian at the National Archives, use images from the exhibit “The Civil War and American Art” to explore the connections between works of art and official records; Rex M. Ellis, associate director for curatorial affairs at the National Museum of African American History and Culture, moderates a panel that includes Ira Berlin, professor of history at University of Maryland. 7 p.m., National Archives, McGowan Theater, Constitution Avenue and Ninth Street NW. Free. 202-357-5000.

“Our Town,” on the 75th anniversary of the Thornton Wilder play, Stephen Rayne directs an updated version. 7:30 p.m. Tuesdays-Fridays, 2 and 7:30 p.m. Saturdays-Sundays, 11 a.m. Feb. 7, 14 and 21, no evening performance on Feb. 10, 17 and 24, Ford’s Theatre, 511 10th St. NW. $15-$62. 202-347-4833 or www.fords.org.

“Hughie,” Eugene O’Neill’s play about a man whose illusions of a grand lifestyle waver after the death of the stranger who quietly validated his larger-than-life confidence. 7:30 p.m. Thursdays and Fridays, 2 and 8 p.m. Saturdays, 2 and 7:30 p.m. Sundays, 7:30 p.m. Tuesdays-Wednesdays, through March 17. Lansburgh Theatre, 450 7th St. NW. $43-$100, discounts for military, students, seniors and patrons age 35 and younger. 202-547-1122 or www.shakespearetheatre.org.

Friday, FEB. 8

Friday Morning Music Club recital, performance of works by Berlioz, Dohnanyi and Poulenc. Noon, Calvary Baptist Church, 755 Eighth St. NW. Free. 202-333-2075.

Tenor Richard Turner, a program of his favorite English-language “songs that tell stories” by composers ranging from medieval to modern. 12:15-1 p.m., St. Alban’s Episcopal Church, 3001 Wisconsin Ave. NW. Free. 202-363-8286 or www.stalbansdc.org.

Afghan American concert, musician and multimedia artist Ariana Delawari performs a blend of Afghan and Western styles. 6 p.m., Kennedy Center, Millennium Stage, 2700 F St. NW. Free. 202-467-4600.

Sip and paint art workshop, with instruction by artists Ellen Cornett and Sheppard Bear, create your own artwork, enjoy snacks and wine. 6:30-8:30 p.m., Capitol Hill Arts Workshop, 545 Seventh St. SE. $30, includes materials and refreshments. 202-547-6839 or www.chaw.org.

Children’s Botanic Garden program, for ages 8-12 and their parents, education specialist Lee Coykendall leads a flashlight tour of the jungle, exploring night-blooming flowers and night pollinators; participate in several hands-on science experiments. 7-9:30 p.m., U.S. Botanic Garden, 100 Maryland Ave. SW. Free, registration required. 202-225-8333 or www.usbg.gov.

“Lost at Sea: The Search for Longitude,” a documentary about John Harrison, the man who discovered the key to navigating the open seas. 7 p.m., Hill Center at the Old Naval Hospital, 921 Pennsylvania Ave. SE. Free, reservations requested. 202-549-4172 or www.hillcenterdc.org.

“The Last Step,” Ali Mosaffa’s 2012 drama that weaves together a murder mystery and a love triangle, in Persian with English subtitles. 7 p.m. Friday and 2 p.m. Sunday, Freer Gallery of Art, Meyer Auditorium, Jefferson Drive and 12th Street SW. Free. 202-633-1000.

Classical piano recital, Angela Hewitt performs works by Bach, Debussy and Ravel. 7:30 p.m., Kennedy Center, Terrace Theater, 2700 F St. NW. $55. 202-785-9727 or www.wpas.org.

Economic growth, Tyler Cowan, George Mason University economics professor, discusses “What Do We Really Know About Economic Growth?” Sponsored by the Philosophical Society of Washington. 8:15 p.m., Cosmos Club, John Wesley Powell Auditorium, 2170 Florida Ave. NW. Free. 703-370-5282.

“Metamorphoses,” written and directed by Mary Zimmerman in association with Lookingglass Theatre Company, the mythical tales of Ovid based on David Slavitt’s translation. Arena Stage, Fichandler Stage, 1101 Sixth St. SW. Call for show times and ticket prices. 202-488-3300 or www.arenastage.org

Saturday, FEB. 9

“The Maestro, Tim Marrone: Clowning Around with Shakespeare,” a play about a lowly court jester’s preparation for his first audience with England’s newly crowned monarch, King James I. Children in the audience assume characters in his performance and provide backup with songs and sound effects. 9:30 and 11 a.m., National Theatre, 1321 Pennsylvania Ave. NW. Free ticket, one per person, distributed 30 minutes before each show. 202-783-3372.

Apulia to Sicily: Exploring Southern Italy, a day-long seminar with travel writer Reid Bramblett, who discusses the timeless traditions of the region, where medieval churches are grafted onto ancient temples and where mozzarella is cultivated near 2,500-year-old ruins. 9:30 a.m.-4 p.m., S. Dillon Ripley Center, 1100 Jefferson Dr. SW. $130; $90 members; $87, senior members. 202-633-3030 or smithsonianassociates.org.

Book sale, most available for $1. 10 a.m.-4 p.m., Southeast Library, 403 Seventh St. SE. 202-698-3377.

Winter tree identification, learn how to identify deciduous trees in winter, botanical terminology and tree anatomy, then tour the Fern Valley Native Plant Collection for hands-on practice. 10 a.m.-noon, U.S. National Arboretum, 3501 New York Ave. NE. $12, registration required. 202-245-4521.

Bananas: Botany, History, Agriculture and Future, Todd Brethauer discusses the 7,000-year evolution of the banana from the jungles of Southeast Asia to your breakfast table. 10:30 a.m., U.S. Botanic Garden, Conservatory Classroom, 100 Maryland Ave. SW. Free, registration required. 202-225-8333.

The Endangered Art of the Mexican Ribozo, this traditional Mexican shawl, woven in resist-dye ikat, is part of a tradition that is in danger of disappearing. Weaver Hillary Steel will show a short film about master weaver Don Evaristo Borboa Casas and discusses the future of this technique. 10:30 a.m., Textile Museum, 2320 S St. NW. Free. 202-667-0441, Ext. 64.

Mardi Gras at the library, make a mask, sample King Cake, create a float and parade around on it. 11:30 a.m., Chevy Chase Library, 5625 Connecticut Ave. NW. Free. 202-282-0021.

Music discussion, music scholars and library curators discuss music in the Lincoln White House. 1 p.m., Library of Congress, Jefferson Building, Whittall Pavilion, 10 First St. SE. Free. 202-707-5502.

U.S. Marine Band concert, “The President’s Own,” under the direction of Col. Michael J. Colburn, pays homage to Francis M. Scala, the first musician to receive the title “Leader of the Band” during President Lincoln’s tenure. 1 p.m., Library of Congress, Coolidge Auditorium, 10 First St. SE. Free tickets available by phone, with a $2.80 service charge per ticket. 202-397-7328 or 202-707-5502 or 202-707-8437.

Walk with a National Park Service ranger, stroll around and explore the history of the memorials. 1-3 p.m. Saturdays-Sundays through Feb. 24, Lincoln Memorial, Survey Lodge, 23rd Street NW and West Potomac Park. Free. 202-426-6841.

Ethnic food discussion, Jeffrey Pilcher, historian and author of “Planet Taco: A Global History of Mexican Food,” Gustavo Arellano, syndicated columnist and author of “Taco USA: How Mexican Food Conquered America” and Smithsonian curator Rayna Green discuss the popularity of Mexican food in the United States, from its indigenous origins to the present era of global commercialization. 1:30 p.m., National Museum of American History, Warner Brothers Theater, 14th Street and Constitution Avenue NW. Free. 202-633-1000.

Be the Artist family program, for age 5 and older with an adult companion, explore portraiture and tour the “Recent Acquisitions” exhibit with a focus on the works of Keith Haring. 2-4 p.m., National Portrait Gallery, Eighth and F streets NW. Free, registration required at www.eventbrite.com/org. 202-633-1000.

To the Mountaintop: Voices of Emancipation, a live theater program about the Emancipation Proclamation, the songs it inspired, evocative images and recitations from prominent African American leaders portrayed by actors London Edgerton and Xavier Carnegie. 3 and 4:30 p.m. Tuesdays-Saturdays, National Museum of American History, second floor, Flag Hall, 14th Street and Constitution Avenue NW. Free. 202-633-1000.

Knit and Lit, informal group of knitters and readers, take knitting or a needlework project to work on as you share patterns and stories. 3 p.m. Saturdays, Georgetown Library, 3307 M St. NW. Free. 202-724-8783.

Violin lessons, for age 12 and older, taught by violinist Clarice Carter, take your own instrument. 3:30 p.m. Saturdays, Woodridge Library, 1801 Hamlin St. NE. Free. 202-541-6226.

Music recital, a performance by the Russian Trio, featuring violinist Nikita Borisevich, cellist Dmitry Volkov and pianist Katherine Rick in a program of works by Haydn and Shostakovich. 6 p.m., Kennedy Center, Millennium Stage, 2700 F St. NW. Free. 202-467-4600.

“The House of the Spirits,” Caridad Svich’s play based on Isabel Allende’s novel that spans four generations of political, social and familial upheaval of a Latin American family, performed in Spanish with English surtitles; a reception follows Saturday’s performance. 8 p.m. Thursdays-Saturdays, 3 p.m. Sundays, continues through March 10, GALA Theatre-Tivoli, 3333 14th St. NW. 800-494-8497 202-234-7174 or www.galatheatre.org.

Sunday, FEB. 10

Phillip Bobbitt lecture, Bobbitt, a professor at Columbia Law School and nephew of President Lyndon B. Johnson, discusses Johnson, Vietnam and other foreign policy aspects of his presidency. 10 a.m., St. John’s Episcopal Church, Lafayette Square, 1525 H St. NW. Free. 202-347-8766.

Music festival, Venetian Renaissance choral music, featuring works of Gabrieli and Monteverdi with the St. John’s Choir and Amadeus Brass Quartet. 11 a.m., St. John’s Episcopal Church, Lafayette Square, 1525 H St. NW. Free. 202-347-8766.

Portrait Story Days: George Washington Carver, listen to a story about the African American scientist and create a special piece of art to take home. 2-5 p.m., National Portrait Gallery, Eighth and F streets NW. Free. 202-633-1000.

U.S. Air Force Band concert, the Air Force Studio Orchestra with merengue singer Melina Leon and classical jazz instrumentalist Paquito D’Rivera . Doors open. 2 p.m. Concert. 3 p.m., DAR Constitution Hall, 18th Street between C and D streets NW. Free. 202-767-5658 or www.usafband.af.mil.

Washington Bach Consort, J. Reilly Lewis performs and leads the ensemble and baritone Mark Duer in a performance that highlights the church’s new organ. 5 p.m., St. John’s Episcopal Church, 3240 O St. NW. $30; seniors and students, $15. 202-338-1796 or www.stjohnsgeorgetown.org.

Music recital, students from the Curtis Institute of Music perform. 6 p.m., Kennedy Center, Terrace Theater, 2700 F St. NW. Free. 202-467-4600.

National Gallery of Art Chamber Players, violinist Miranda Cuckson and cellist Julia Bruskin perform music by Jeffrey Mumford, composer-in-residence. Latecomers not admitted. 6:30 p.m., National Gallery of Art, West Building Garden Court, 600 Constitution Ave. NW. Free. 202-842-6941.

Martin Luther King Jr. tribute concert, a co-presentation of the Choral Arts Society of Washington and the Men, Women and Children of the Gospel Choir of the Washington Performing Arts Society. 7 p.m., Kennedy Center, Concert Hall, 2700 F St. NW. $25-$45. 202-785-9727.

Monday, FEB. 11

Young Portrait Explorers: Abraham Lincoln, for age 5 and younger with an adult companion, look at a portrait or two, listen to a story about the former president and participate in a hands-on activity. 10:30 a.m., National Portrait Gallery, Eighth and F streets NW. Free. 202-633-1000.

George Washington’s “First” Birthday, National Park Service Rangers in Colonial period clothing honor and discuss the president’s “first” birthday 280 years ago; sign his birthday sheet with a quill pen. 11 a.m.-1 p.m. and 2-3:30 p.m., Thomas Jefferson Memorial, 900 Ohio Dr. SW. Free. Call Mike Rose, 202-438-9667.

Smithsonian preservation program, two sessions at two sites, for ages 8-11, visitors learn from primary resources about preserving family oral histories and objects; includes a reading of Calvin Ramsey and Gwen Strauss’s “Ruth and the Green Book” that tells the history of segregation. 1 p.m., Rosedale Library, 1701 Gales St. NE. 202-727-5012. Second session, 5 p.m. at Parklands-Turner Library, 1547 Alabama Ave. SE. 202-645-4532. Free. .

Computer class: Microsoft Excel, learn basic skills, take your own flash drive or your e-mail address to save class documents. 1:30 p.m., Martin Luther King Jr. Memorial Library, 901 G St. NW. Free. 202-727-0321.

Chinese New Year, for age 4 and older, celebrate the Year of the Snake with a video of a dragon dance, learn about Chinese New Year traditions and Chinese Zodiac animals, make a dragon puppet to take home. 4 p.m., Petworth Library, 4200 Kansas Ave. NW. Free, registration requested. 202-243-1188.

Smithsonian preservation program, for ages 8-11, white-gloved library visitors may learn from primary resources about preserving family oral histories and objects; a reading of Calvin Ramsey’s “Ruth and the Green Book” tells the history of segregation. 5 p.m., Parklands-Turner Library, 1547 Alabama Ave. SE. Free. 202-645-4532.

Chess Club, for children and teens. 5:30 p.m., Woodridge Library, 1801 Hamlin St. NE. Free. 202-541-6226.

The Brandee Younger Quartet performs. 6 p.m., Kennedy Center, Theater Lab, 2700 F St. NW. Free. 202-467-4600.

“A Room with a View,” James Ivory’s 1986 film adaptation of the E.M. Forster novel, starring Maggie Smith, Helena Bonham Carter and Denholm Elliott. 6 p.m., Martin Luther King Jr. Memorial Library, 901 G St. NW. Free. 202-727-0321.

Black history lecture, historian C.R. Gibbs on “Let Your Motto Be Resistance: Great Slave Revolts.” 6:30 p.m., Capitol View Library, 5001 Central Ave. SE. Free. 202-645-0755.

“Democracy Under Attack — An Intervention,” Romuald Karmakar’s 2012 film about a symposium held in Berlin on the current state of today’s democracy; in German with English subtitles. 6:30 p.m., Goethe-Institut, 812 Seventh St. NW. $7; seniors and students, $4. 202-289-1200.

In the Heat of the Night,” Norman Jewison’s 1967 film about a black Philadelphia homicide detective who gets involved in the murder investigation of a prominent businessman in the Deep South, starring Sidney Poitier, Rod Steiger and Lee Grant. 6:30 p.m., Chevy Chase Library, 5625 Connecticut Ave. NW. Free. 202-282-0021.

Thornton Wilder’s classic one-acts, students from American, Georgetown and Howard universities read one-act plays by Wilder including “The Long Christmas Dinner,” “Pullman Car Hiawatha,” and “The Happy Journey to Trenton and Camden.” 7 p.m., Ford’s Theatre, 511 10th St. NW. Free, tickets required. 202-347-4833 or www.fords.org/event.

Poetry readings, by B.H. Fairchild and Mary Jo Bang, a reception follows. 7:30 p.m., Folger Shakespeare Library, 201 East Capitol St. SE. $15. 202-544-7077.

Tuesday, FEB. 12

Diane Macklin’s “Succotash Tales,” for ages 3-8, the master storyteller offers a compelling link to the African griot tradition to celebrate African American stories, traditions and folklore. 10:15 and 11:30 a.m. Tuesday-Wednesday, Discovery Theater at S. Dillon Ripley Center, 1100 Jefferson Dr. SW. $8; ages 2-16, $6; 1 and younger, $3. 202-633-8700 or www.discoverytheater.org.

Abraham Lincoln’s 204th birthday, National Park Service rangers in Civil War period clothing lead a program that honors the president. 11 a.m. and 2 p.m., Lincoln Memorial, 23rd Street NW and West Potomac Park. Free. Call Mike Rose, 202-438-9667.

Music for Mardi Gras, a parish party, complete with home-cooked jambalaya, red beans and rice, king cakes, a Dixieland jazz band, dancing and a parade on G Street. 6-8:30 p.m. Church of the Epiphany, 1317 G St. NW. Adults, $15, 12 and under $5. 202-347-2635, Ext. 20 or www.epiphanydc.org.

Homework cafe, a quiet place for students in grades kindergarten through 12 to work on homework assignments. 3-5 p.m. Tuesdays, Tenley-Friendship Library, 4450 Wisconsin Ave. NW. Free. 202-727-1488.

Tippi toes hip-hop dance class, for ages 7 and older, learn choreography and dances. 5:30-6:15 p.m. Tuesdays through May 7, Hill Center at the Old Naval Hospital, 921 Pennsylvania Ave. SE. $75 per month plus $30 registration fee. 202-549-4172 or www.hillcenterdc.org.

Bellevue teen chess club, for players of all skill levels. 6 p.m. Tuesdays, William O. Lockridge/Bellevue Library, 115 Atlantic St. SW. Free. 202-243-1184.

Music recital, Students from the Eastman School of Music perform. 6 p.m., Kennedy Center, Millennium Stage, 2700 F St. NW. Free. 202-467-4600.

Animal Planet’s Battleground: Rhino Wars, Erin Wanner discusses what went into creating the upcoming three-part miniseries “Battleground: Rhino Wars,” which premieres March 7, including the conflict between poachers and one of South Africa’s anti-poaching units that recruited former and current members of U.S. Special Forces to stop the illegal and lucrative trade of rhino horns. 7 p.m., American University, Wechsler Theater, third floor, Mary Graydon Center, 4400 Massachusetts Ave. NW. Free. 202-885-3408 or www.filmmakersforconservation.org.

“Saving Lincoln,” a screening of the new film, a true story about Abraham Lincoln’s fiery trial as commander in chief, recounted by his close personal friend and bodyguard, U.S. Marshal Ward Hill Lamon. 7 p.m., Hill Center at the Old Naval Hospital, 921 Pennsylvania Ave. SE. Free. 202-549-4172 or www.hillcenterdc.org.

Royal Concertgebouw Orchestra, featuring Greek violinist Leonidas Kavakos and conductor Mariss Jansons. 8 p.m., Kennedy Center, Concert Hall, 2700 F St. NW. $45-$115. 202-785-9727 or www.wpas.org.

Shakespeare’s “Henry V,” the historic play, directed by Robert Richmond. 7:30 p.m. Tuesdays-Thursdays, 8 p.m. Fridays, 2 and 8 p.m. Saturdays, 2 and 7:30 p.m. Sundays, through March 3, Folger Shakespeare Library, 201 East Capitol St. SE. Tuesday, pay what you can. Previews, $30-$40. Regular shows, $30-$68. 202-544-7077 or www.folger.edu/theatre.

Wednesday, FEB. 13

John Paul Jones and Joshua Barney, a National Park Service ranger discusses the heroes who gave us examples of how to run a fighting ship, win campaigns, be an officer and more. 10 a.m. and 2 p.m., National World War II Memorial, 17th Street and Constitution Avenue NW. Free. Call Joseph Mohr, 202-359-1532.

Gallery talk, Mike Buscher,Geography and Map division, discusses Jedediah Hotchkiss’s Map of the Shenandoah Valley. Noon, “The Civil War in America” exhibit, Southwest Gallery, Library of Congress, Jefferson Building, 10 First St. SE. Free. 202-707-9203.

Suleyman the Magnificent,” the Metropolitan Museum of Art and National Gallery of Art’s 1987 film of the 16th century Ottoman sultan, military leader, poet and enthusiastic patron of art and architecture. Noon, Textile Museum, 2320 S St. NW. Free. 202-667-0441, Ext. 64.

Thomas Jefferson and slavery, a National Park Service ranger discusses the president’s views on slavery. 1 and 5 p.m., Thomas Jefferson Memorial, 900 Ohio Dr. SW. Free. Call David Rappel, 202-359-1533.

Chess for kids, instruction for all ages and all skill levels. 4 p.m. Wednesdays, Cleveland Park Library, 3310 Connecticut Ave. NW. 202-282-3080; and 5:30 p.m. Wednesdays, Francis A. Gregory Library, 3660 Alabama Ave. SE. 202-645-4297. Free.

Music recital, Students from San Francisco Conservatory of Music perform. 6 p.m., Kennedy Center, Terrace Theater, 2700 F St. NW. Free. 202-467-4600.

“Roads of Arabia: From Trade Routes to Pilgrimage Trails,” Massumeh Farhad, chief curator of Islamic art at the Freer and Sackler galleries, discusses the exhibition and the meaning and function of some of the objects, including mysterious steles and statues and gold funerary masks. 7 p.m., S. Dillon Ripley Center, 1100 Jefferson Dr. SW. $25. 202-633-3030.

Race,” performance of David Mamet’s drama that ruthlessly examines questions of guilt, betrayal, sexual consent and racial prejudice. 7:30 p.m. Wednesdays and Thursdays, 3 p.m. and 8 p.m. Saturdays (8 p.m. only Feb. 16), 3 p.m. and 7:30 p.m. Sundays, noon March 1 and 8. Through March 17. Washington D.C. Jewish Community Center, Theater J, 1529 16th St. NW. $45, seniors and members $40, group of 10-plus $35, seniors group of 10-plus, $30. 800-494-8497 or www.theaterj.org or www.boxofficetickets.com.

Thursday, FEB. 14

Chess club, tailored for ages 2 and older. 10 a.m. Thursdays, Woodridge Library, 1801 Hamlin St. NE. Free. 202-541-6226.

“Harriet Tubman: The Chosen One,” a performance by Gwendolyn Briley-Strand followed by a a question-and-answer session. 10:30 a.m. and 1 p.m., THEARC Theater, 1901 Mississippi Ave. SE. Free. 202-889-5901 or www.thearcdc.org.

Step Afrika! Reads, a program that promotes reading and literacy skills for ages 2-5 with a special story time followed by a mini-workshop with the artists from Step Afrika’s newest production. 11 a.m., Hill Center at the Old Naval Hospital, 921 Pennsylvania Ave. SE. Free. 202-549-4172 or www.hillcenterdc.org.

Kluge Center lecture, Fellow Joel Frykholm discusses “The Lost Tycoon: Rediscovering George Kleine, Reframing Early American Cinema.” Noon, Library of Congress, Room 119, Jefferson Building, 10 First St. SE. Free. 202-707-3302.

The language of flowers, Amy Brecount White, author of “Forget-Her-Nots,” demonstrates how to improve and enliven your communication skills using the Victorian language of flowers, telling about their literary origins and the technique of assembling a “tussie-mussie,” or nosegay. 1 p.m., U.S. Botanic Garden, Conservatory Garden Court, 100 Maryland Ave. SW. Free. 202-225-8333.

“Romance the Evening: Cocktails in the Conservatory,” for adults, wine, champagne, chocolate-covered strawberries and other delightful treats in the Conservatory of the 1816 National Historic Landmark mansion with music to accompany your stroll the house and its collections and more. 5-7 p.m., Tudor Place, 1644 31st St. NW. $20 per couple; $12 per individual. 202-965-0400. Register: http://tudorplaceromancetheevening.eventbrite.com/ .

Conservatory project, Students from The Juilliard School perform as part of the Kennedy Center’s Conservatory Project. 6 p.m., Kennedy Center, Terrace Theater, 2700 F St. NW. Free. 202-467-4600.

“Our Town,” on the 75th anniversary of the Thornton Wilder play, Stephen Rayne directs Stephen Rayne directs an updated version. 7:30 p.m. Tuesdays-Fridays, 2 and 7:30 p.m. Saturdays-Sundays, 11 a.m. and Feb. 21, no evening performance on Feb. 17 and 24, Ford’s Theatre, 511 10th St. NW. $15-$62. 202-347-4833 or www.fords.org.

An Evening with Debra Tidwell, the local jazz vocalist and cabaret artist performs a musical variety show, “Love . . . and All Its Symptoms,” partly funded by the D.C. Commission on the Arts and Humanities. 7:30 p.m., Hill Center at the Old Naval Hospital, 921 Pennsylvania Ave. SE. $15. 202-549-4172 or www.hillcenterdc.org.

Pink Martini in concert. 8 p.m., Kennedy Center, Concert Hall, 2700 F St. NW. $30-$90. 202-785-9727 or www.wpas.org.

The Skin of Our Teeth,” Thornton Wilder’s 1942 Pulitzer Prize-winning story of an American family’s survival in the face of incredible obstacles. 8 p.m. Friday, 2 and 8 p.m. Saturday, American University, Harold and Sylvia Greenberg Theatre, 4200 Massachusetts Ave. NW. $15. 202-885-2587 or auarts@american.edu.

— Compiled by Gerri Marmer

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